Intro

Many people rely on proprietary chat solutions like Skype, but those solutions pose serious concerns for both privacy and security. Additionally, development of the Skype Linux client has been unpredictable at best, even stalling for a number of years, only to resume just recently.
qTox running on Ubuntu

Django is easily the most popular web framework written in Python. It strikes a delicate balance between feature completeness and efficiency, including powerful features like automatic migration generation and a full-featured admin interface. Setting up a Django development environment in Ubuntu is fairly easy, and can be done in only a few steps.

Installing Virtualenv

It’s best to use a Python virtual environment when developing in a complex framework like Django, especially if you intend to work on multiple projects at once. It’s also probably a good idea to make sure that you have both versions of Python up to date.
$ sudo apt-get install virtualenv python python3

Git has become the default version control system for much of the open source world. While Git hosting services like Github and Bitbucket are good and work well, they leave you dependent on those services for everything, including crucial factors like uptime and security. Aside from that, neither of those services are open source. Thankfully, an alternative exists in the form of Gitlab.

Gitlab is an open source Git repository service written in Ruby on Rails that can either be self-hosted, or purchased as a service. Hosting Gitlab is fairly easy, especially since it comes in a per-configured "Omnibus" package.
Ubuntu 16.04 running MPD Gitlab

August 22, 2016
by Rares Aioanei

Introduction

What are snaps and why you should use them? The Linux ecosystem has suffered from an old problem since the dawn of the concept of 'distribution', and that problem is fragmentation. One of the biggest issues that cause this fragmentation is different package formats; I can't run my .debs on my Fedora system or my .rpms on my Ubuntu machine. Yes, we do have alien, which should allow the transition between the two formats, but there are two problems with this approach : there are other package formats besides rpm and deb and besides, alien doesn't always work as expected. So the issue is still there, or I should say, was there. Enter snap, the universal Linux package format, which strives to offer users and developers a single packaging format and easiness when it comes to creating new packages with the applications and libraries that are needed, ensuring that said packages are easily shareable between distributions. Dell, Samsung and the Linux Foundation are quoted as contributors, while among supported distributions are Fedora, Ubuntu, Arch or OpenSUSE.

This article will detail how to use snaps as a simple user, as well as instructions for developers/packagers on how to create snaps for others to use. The OS we're gonna use is Ubuntu 16.04, but the instructions below shouldn't be hard to adapt to other distributions.

Snaps as a simple user

This part will give you a tour of snap from a user perspective : how to install the necessary tools and how to use them for basic, day-to-day usage. First, you need to install snapcraft, a package that provide snap, the go-to tool for aforementioned day-to-day operations :
 $ sudo apt install snapcraft

Linux has a ton of options when it comes to media players. Many of them are just as feature packed as their proprietary counterparts on other operating systems. What most Linux users don’t realize is that there are additional options that utilize one of Linux’s greatest strengths, servers. MPD(Music Player Daemon) is a lightweight server for sharing a music library both locally and over a network.

The best aspect of MPD is, by far, its flexibility. Not only does MPD allow music to be shared and played over the network, but it also allows for numerous different front end clients. These clients range from full graphical music players to minimal command line options.

Ubuntu 16.04 running MPD with the Cantata client

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