Netplan static ip on Ubuntu configuration

Netplan static IP on Ubuntu configuration

In this article we will discuss a netplan static IP configuration on Ubuntu Linux. Netplan allows for straightforward network IP address configuration using human-readable data-serialization language YAML. The article will also discuss a default Netplan network settings and the location of the Netplan configuration file.

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Rsync examples in Linux

Rsync examples in Linux

rsync stands for “remote sync” and is a powerful command line utility for synchronizing directories either on a local system or with remote machines. It’s built into nearly every Linux system by default and this tutorial will help you to understand rsync better by providing you most common rsync examples administrators use to keep the data synchronised across multiple server/hosts.

Some users mistakenly think of rsync as a file copying tool, like cp or scp.While there’s some overlap, rsync excels in synchronization, specifically. In other words, it can take a source directory and make an identical destination directory.

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NFS vs SAMBA vs CIFS

NFS vs SAMBA vs CIFS

NFS, SAMBA, and CIFS are three different terms that get thrown around a lot whenever someone mentions file sharing between two or more systems. But, do you know what these three implementations do, and how they do it differently from one another? For some reason these technologies remain in a shroud of mystery to even some seasoned system administrators.

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How to crack a wireless WEP key using aircrack-ng

How to crack a wireless WEP key using AIR Crack

This article shortly describes simple steps on how to crack a wireless WEP key using aircrack-ng software. This can be done by sniffing a wireless network, capturing encrypted packets and running appropriate encryption cracking program in an attempt to decrypt captured data. WEP ( Wired Equivalent Privacy ) is quite easy to crack as it uses only one key to encrypt all traffic.

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Various commands used to detect a connected network cable on Linux

How to detect whether a physical cable is connected to network card slot on Linux

If you’ve ever needed to know whether a physical cable is connected to a network port on your Linux system, you don’t necessarily need to be right in front of the computer or server to look and see. There are several methods we can use from the Linux command line in order to see if a cable is plugged into a network slot.

There are a few reasons why this could come in handy. For one, it shows you whether the system itself detects that there’s a cable plugged in. This could be an essential troubleshooting step if you know for a fact that the cable is properly plugged in, yet the system is not detecting it. It’s also helpful on remote systems or if you’re just too lazy to look at the back of the computer and see if the cable is plugged in.

Check out some of the examples below where we go over various commands that check whether a physical network cable is plugged in or not.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to detect physical network cable connectivity with Bash commands and ethtool

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How to configure DHCP on Linux

What is DHCP and how to configure DHCP server in Linux

DHCP is a networking protocol used to assign IP addresses to networked devices. In this guide, we’ll introduce you to the protocol and explain how it works. You’ll also see how to implement a DHCP server on Linux systems, and configure it for your own network.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • What is DHCP?
  • How to implement a DHCP server on major Linux distros
  • How to configure DHCP on Linux

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Changing the MAC address with the macchanger command on Linux

Change mac address with macchanger Linux command

A Media Access Control (MAC) address is a unique number that gets assigned to every network interface, including Ethernet and wireless. It’s used by many system programs and protocols in order to identify a network interface. One of the most common examples would be in the case of DHCP, where a router assigns an IP address to a network interface automatically. The router will know which device it has assigned an IP address to by referring to the MAC address.

Unlike an IP address, which is temporary and can be changed easily, MAC addresses are hardcoded into a network interface from the manufacturer. However, it’s still possible to change or “spoof” a MAC address temporarily. On Linux systems, one of the easiest ways to do this is with the macchanger command line program. There are both legitimate and shady reasons for why a Linux user may find the need to change a MAC address.

In this guide, we’ll show how to install the macchanger program on major Linux distros and then use the macchanger command to change the MAC address of a network interface either to a random value or some specific number. Follow the examples below to learn how.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install macchanger on major Linux distros
  • How to identify current MAC address and network interface
  • How to change an interface’s MAC address
  • How to change interface to a specific MAC address

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How to manage dynamic virtual hosts with Apache and the mod_vhost_alias module

The Apache web server has the ability to serve multiple websites from the same IP address, using virtual hosts. Each Virtual Host can be configured in the main server configuration file, or, thanks to the Include or the IncludeOptional
directives, in its own dedicated one. When the number of virtual hosts increases, their management starts to become troublesome. If their configuration is quite similar, we can manage them dynamically, thanks to the mod_vhost_alias module. In this tutorial we will see how to do it.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • What is an Apache virtual host
  • How to check if the mod_vhost_alias module is enabled
  • How to load the mod_vhost_alias module on Debian and Red Hat family of distributions
  • How to manage dynamic virtual hosts using the mod_vhost_alias module
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Linking two Docker containers together through networking on Linux

Basic networking example on how to connect docker containers

One of the many desirable features built directly into Docker is networking. Docker’s networking feature can be accessed by using a --link flag which allows to connect any number of Docker containers without the need to expose a container’s internal ports to the outside world.

In this guide, you will learn how to network two or more Docker containers together on a Linux system through command line instructions. This will work on any Linux distribution. Check out the step by step instructions below to find out how.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to network Docker containers together

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