Enabling full disk encryption in Ubuntu 22.04 Jammy Jellyfish Linux

Ubuntu 22.04 Enable full disk encryption

The best way to keep your Ubuntu 22.04 system and files completely secure in the case of theft is to enable full disk encryption. This way, if your device is stolen or someone is sitting at your desk and trying to boot into your PC, they will need to know your password in order to mount any partitions. Even if they access the hard drive content through other means, all files would be encrypted and no one could read their contents.

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How to define a custom Firewalld zone

Firewalld is the default high-level firewall manager on the Red Hat family of distributions. One of its peculiarities is that it defines a series of so called firewall zones: each zone can be considered like a different level of trust and can be configured to allow traffic through a specific set of ports. While Firewalld comes with some predefined zones which can be easily examined and modified, sometimes we may want to create our custom zones from scratch.

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How to set a root password on Ubuntu 22.04 Jammy Jellyfish Linux

How to set a root password on Ubuntu 22.04 Jammy Jellyfish Linux

Although it is conventional to log into the root account on some Linux systems, by default Ubuntu 22.04 does not allow us to log into root and instead expects us to achieve root permissions through use of sudo. However, it is still possible to set a root password and subsequently log directly into root. In this tutorial, you will see how to set a password for the root account on Ubuntu 22.04 Jammy Jellyfish.

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Prompt asking us to register the Red Hat system in order to receive updates

There are no enabled repositories RHEL solution

You may receive a There are no enabled repos error message when trying to install system updates on a fresh Red Hat Linux install. This occurs when you have not enabled your RHEL subscription. In this tutorial, we will take you through the step by step instructions to register your RHEL subscription, enable the package manager, and finally install updates and remedy the error message for good.

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Logged into the root account in GUI on Kali Linux

Set Kali root password and enable root login

Until recently, Kali Linux used the root account by default and now you need to set Kali root password manually. In the latest versions of Kali, root login is disabled, forcing you to login to the GUI as your normal user account. The reasoning behind this change should be obvious, but if you’re a Kali user, you probably know your way around a Linux system by now, and there’s not much risk in letting you use the root account to login.

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Forgot ubuntu server password?

Forgot ubuntu server password?

If you have forgotten the password to your Ubuntu Linux server account, you do not necessarily have to go back to square one and reinstall the whole operating system. It is possible to recover and reset the server password, whether it be the root user account or a normal user, even without the old password. In this tutorial, we will take you through the step by step instructions of recovering a forgotten root or normal account password on an Ubuntu server.

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Disabling the keyring popup message on Ubuntu

How to disable keyring popup on Ubuntu

Ubuntu’s keyring is a feature that collects all of your passwords in a secure application (gnome-keyring) and will use these stored passwords to automatically log you in to various services. All of your stored passwords inside of the keyring are protected by a single master password. The keyring gets “unlocked” when you first provide your system password at sign in.

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How to enable and disable SSH for user on Linux

How to enable and disable SSH for user on Linux

After installing SSH on your Linux system, one of the most important security practices it to make sure that the service is only enabled for intended accounts. If you have one or more accounts which do not need SSH access, then the service should be disabled for those accounts. This is to prevent one being exploited, or maybe you just do not want that particular user to be using SSH to access the server.

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