How often do you have to reboot your Linux server?

Are you tired of constantly having to reboot your servers to fix issues or apply updates? You’re not alone. Server maintenance and uptime can be a tricky balance, and the decision of when to reboot a server comes with trade-offs. In this article, we’ll take a deep dive into the reasons why servers may need to be rebooted, the potential consequences of not rebooting, and the different approaches to server maintenance and uptime.

We’ll also explore tools and techniques that can minimize the need for reboots. Whether you’re a sysadmin, a developer, or a manager, this article will give you a better understanding of the complexities of server maintenance and uptime and help you make informed decisions about when to reboot your servers.

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Clone partition on Linux

Clone partition on Linux

Making a clone of a disk partition is a great way to make a complete backup. This type of backup would preserve all your system and personal files on that particular partition. Cloning and restoring a disk partition is relatively easy, even if you are cloning the partition on to a completely different storage device.

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MBR/DOS vs GPT partition scheme for Linux

MBR/DOS vs GPT partition scheme for Linux

When partitioning a hard disk or other storage device, you have a choice on what type of partition scheme to use. By far, the two most common partition schemes to use are MBR (Master Boot Record, sometimes also referred to as msdos) and GPT (GUID Partition Table). When preparing to partition and format your hard drive, it is important to understand the differences between these two schemes in order to choose which one is ideal for your situation.

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How to check memory size in Linux

How to check memory size in Linux

If you want to know the memory size of your Linux system, you will be relieved to know that it is not necessary to crack open the PC or boot into the BIOS screen to get your information. Linux allows us to check our memory size, and other relevant information such as spare slots and RAM speed, etc, all from within the operating system. We will go over some of these hardware checking methods below.

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How to partition a drive on Linux

How to partition a drive on Linux

Every hard disk, in order to be accessible under Linux, must have at least one partition on it. A partition is a way to logically separate different sections of a disk. For example, a 4 TB hard drive could have four different 1 TB partitions, and all would appear as separate storage systems under the operating system. Alternatively, a hard disk could simply contain a single partition that spans the entire volume. The configuration is entirely up to the user.

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