How to perform unattended linux installations with kickstart

How to perform unattended Linux installations with Kickstart

Kickstart is an automatic installation method natively available on those distributions which uses the Anaconda installer: Red Hat Enterprise Linux (and its clones) and Fedora. It can also be used to install Ubuntu, actually, but in that context it acts as a layer of compatibility to the debian-native preseeding method. With Kickstart we can perform unattended, customizable and reproducible installations.

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How to install KDE plasma Desktop on Fedora Linux

How to install KDE plasma Desktop on Fedora Linux

By default, the Fedora Linux distribution sports the GNOME desktop environment, although others are available in “Spin” downloads. If you would like to change things up and install KDE Plasma instead, the GUI can be downloaded and installed directly from Fedora’s default package repositories.

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Kubuntu vs Fedora KDE plasma desktop

Kubuntu vs Fedora KDE plasma desktop

One of the best aspects of using a Linux system is that there are many popular desktop environments to choose from. If you do not like the style or behavior of yours, it is simple enough to install a different one. When it comes to the KDE Plasma desktop environment, there are a few different ways to experience it.

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Installation of KeePassX Password Manager on Fedora Linux

Installation of KeePassX Password Manager on Fedora Linux

KeePassX is a cross platform password manager to allow users to store and organize passwords by keeping them safe using advanced encryption techniques. It allows you to create a database in which your passwords will be stored and protected by one master password. This database can then be backed up or trasferred to a new system as necessary. You can also import that databsae into another instance of KeePassX.

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Check RPM package dependencies on Rhel/Centos/Rocky

Check RPM package dependencies on Rhel/Centos/Rocky

Files with the .RPM extension are software packages intended for installation on Red Hat Enterprise Linux or one of its derivative Linux distributions, such as CentOS, AlmaLinux, Rocky Linux, or Fedora. When you install software by using an RPM file, your system may need to install dependencies for it to run correctly. This is common behavior for the dnf package manager as well, so you may already be familiar with package dependencies. In this tutorial, we will show you how to check the package dependencies for an RPM file on RHEL and similar distros.

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How to restore hibernation on Fedora

Hibernation, also known as “suspend to disk”, is the most efficient power saving mode in terms of energy consumption. On hibernation, the state of the random access memory is stored on disk, and the machine is completely power down. Although efficient, hibernation is commonly not recommended if using a solid state drive, because each time the system enters this power state, a lot of data must be written to disk, which as we know, has a limited number of write cycles. For this and other reasons, as the the low number of machines on which hibernation works reliably on Linux, Fedora decided to disable this power state by default.

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How to install and use snaps on Fedora

Developed by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, and originally meant to be used on the latter, the Snappy package manager is a free and open source software used to install and manage snap packages. The purpose of Snap packages, just like flatpaks, is to distribute sandboxed and self-contained applications (applications are packaged together with their dependencies).

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Fedora Workstation running GNOME desktop

Fedora Download

The Fedora Linux distribution is sponsored and backed by Red Hat. It’s available for free and acts as a sort of testing ground for Red Hat’s flagship operating system, Red Hat Enterprise Linux. As a result, Fedora contains many of the newest ideas and bleeding edge technology.

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VirtualBox Guest Additions installation of Fedora Linux

Virtualbox Guest additions installation on Fedora Linux

If you’re running Fedora Linux inside a VirtualBox virtual machine, installing the Guest Additions software will help you get the most out of the system. VirtualBox Guest Additions will give the machine more capabilities, such as a shared clipboard with the host system, drag and drop file transfer, and automatic window resizing.

This makes copying data to and from a host system much more convenient. It also changes the VM’s resolution automatically when its window is resized, so you don’t need to change it manually. Guest Additions will work with just about any Linux distribution, but instrutions can differ because of dependencies and package managers.

In this guide, we’ll be going over the step by step instructions to get VirtualBox Guest Additions installed on Fedora Linux. With these instructions, it doesn’t matter what host system you’re using, as long as the virtual machine is running Fedora. This guide assumes that you’ve already installed Fedora in the VM correctly.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install VirtualBox Guest Addition on Fedora
VirtualBox Guest Additions installation of Fedora Linux

VirtualBox Guest Additions installation of Fedora Linux

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