Convert ext3 to ext4 in Linux

Convert ext3 to ext4 in Linux

The ext4 filesystem includes multiple improvements in terms of performance, over its predecessor ext3. Ext4 is not only faster than ext3, but can also handle much larger filesystems and files, and lots of other improvements under the hood. If you haven’t yet upgraded to ext4 on Linux, it’s definitely time to do so.

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Configuring write caching on Linux

How linux write cache works

Let’s start by explaining what write-back caching is and how it works to better understand the Linux write cache. Write caching is a feature available on most hard drives that allows them to collect all data into the drive’s cache memory, before being permanently written to disk. Once a certain amount of data is collected in the hard drive’s cache memory, the whole data chunk is transferred and stored with a single writing event.

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Adjusting the size of the virtual machine's hard disk

VirtualBox increase disk size on Linux

In this tutorial you will learn how to increase disk size on VirtualBox. One of the great things about installing an operating system into a virtual machine is that we can easily change the machine’s CPU utilization limit, its memory usage, and the amount of hard drive space it has. With VirtualBox, all of these hardware specifications can even be changed long after the virtual machine is created.

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Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction

Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction

This tutorial will deal with Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction. MEGA is one of the most famous cloud storage and file hosting services available. The service offered by the company are normally accessible via web interface or dedicated applications also on smartphone operating systems such as Android or iOS. In this article we see how to access the service from the command line via a free and open source set of tools written in Python: Megatools.

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wipefs Linux command tutorial with examples

wipefs Linux command tutorial with examples

The wipefs Linux command utility can be used to erase various types of signatures from a device (partition tables, filesystem signatures, etc…). It is available in the repository of all the most used Linux distributions, and it is usually installed by default as part of of the util-linux package, which contains also other essentials utilities aimed at system maintenance, so we should never have to install it explicitly. In this tutorial we will see how to use wipefs to gather information about the existing signatures and how to erase them.

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