How to write nautilus extensions with nautilus-python

How to write Nautilus extensions with nautilus-python

Nautilus, also known as “Files”, is the default file manager of the GNOME desktop environment. In a previous tutorial we saw how to create and call custom scripts from the Nautilus context-menu: this feature can be really useful but is somehow limited. By installing the nautilus-python package in our favorite Linux distribution, and writing just few lines of Python code, we can overcome such limitations and create proper Nautilus extensions.

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Introduction to the OverlayFS

The OverlayFS pseudo-filesystem was first included in the Linux kernel 3.18 release: it allows us to combine two directory trees or filesystems (an “upper” and a “lower one”) in a way that is completely transparent to the user, which is able to access files and directories on the “merged” layer just like he would do on a standard filesystem.

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How to get and change image metadata in Linux

How to get and change audio metadata in Linux

Audio metadata contains information like artist, song title, track number, album name, etc. It can even contain an embedded image of the cover art for the album. This metadata is accessed by music players in order to display relevant information about the song that is playing. Without this metadata, a music player might have trouble sorting your music by artist, album, genre, or putting the tracks in proper order.

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Using the mv, rename, and mmv commands to rename files between uppercase and lowercase on Linux

Rename all file names from uppercase to lowercase characters

As a Linux user, you’re likely already familiar with using the mv command to rename a file on a Linux system. The task becomes a little more difficult when you need to rename multiple files at the same time on Linux.

One of the most common batch renaming jobs that are performed is to change all file names to lowercase letters. There are several different ways to do this on Linux. One way is with the native mv utility and a bit of Bash scripting, and the other methods involve the rename and mmv tools, which may or may not already be installed on your Linux distro by default.

In this guide, we’ll go over various command line examples to rename all files from uppercase to lowercase letters on Linux. Some commands will work only for files, some for directories, and some commands work recursively. Take a look at all the different examples below to decide which command(s) to use that would best suit your needs.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to rename all files from uppercase to lowercase using mv, rename, or mmv commands
  • How to install rename and mmv on major Linux distros

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How to set filesystems mount order on modern Linux distributions

In a previous tutorial we discussed about the /etc/fstab file, and how it is used to declare the filesystems which should be mounted on boot. In the pre-Systemd era, filesystem where mounted in the order specified in the /etc/fstab file; on modern Linux distributions, instead, for a faster boot, filesystem are mounted in parallel. Systemd manages the mounting of filesystems via specifically designed units automatically generated from /etc/fstab entries. For these reasons a different strategy must be adopted to establish the dependency between two filesystems, and therefore to set their correct mount order.

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How to force fsck to check filesystem after system reboot on Linux

How to force fsck to check filesystem after system reboot on Linux

Checking the file system for errors is an important part of Linux system administration. It is a good troubleshooting step to perform when encountering bad performance on read and write times, or file system errors. In this tutorial, we will explain a procedure on how to force fsck to perform a file system check on the next system reboot or force file system check for any desired number of system reboots, whether it is the root or a non-root mount point.

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