Convert ext3 to ext4 in Linux

Convert ext3 to ext4 in Linux

The ext4 filesystem includes multiple improvements in terms of performance, over its predecessor ext3. Ext4 is not only faster than ext3, but can also handle much larger filesystems and files, and lots of other improvements under the hood. If you haven’t yet upgraded to ext4 on Linux, it’s definitely time to do so.

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How to tune Linux extended (ext) filesystems using dumpe2fs and tune2fs

The ext2, ext3 and ext4 filesystems are some of the most known and used filesystems specifically designed for Linux. The first one, ext2 (second extended filesystems) is, as its name suggests, the older of the three. It has no journal feature, which is the biggest advantage of its successor over him: ext3. Released in 2008, ext4 is the more recent, and currently the default filesystem on many Linux distributions.

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Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction

Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction

This tutorial will deal with Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction. MEGA is one of the most famous cloud storage and file hosting services available. The service offered by the company are normally accessible via web interface or dedicated applications also on smartphone operating systems such as Android or iOS. In this article we see how to access the service from the command line via a free and open source set of tools written in Python: Megatools.

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wipefs Linux command tutorial with examples

wipefs Linux command tutorial with examples

The wipefs Linux command utility can be used to erase various types of signatures from a device (partition tables, filesystem signatures, etc…). It is available in the repository of all the most used Linux distributions, and it is usually installed by default as part of of the util-linux package, which contains also other essentials utilities aimed at system maintenance, so we should never have to install it explicitly. In this tutorial we will see how to use wipefs to gather information about the existing signatures and how to erase them.

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logrotate command in Linux with examples

logrotate command in Linux with examples

In Linux, many applications and system services will store log files. These log files give a Linux administrator insight into how their system is performing, and are invaluable when troubleshooting issues. However, log files can get unwieldy very quickly. For example, if your web server software logs every visit to your website, and you get thousands of viewers per day, there will be way too much information to feasibly squeeze into one text file.

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