Mozilla Firefox is a really popular browser to use on Linux systems, with many or most distros even including it as the default web browser. It even edges out Chrome and Chromium, at least in the Linux world.

Some Linux distributions, like Kali or Debian include a different version of Firefox, called Firefox ESR (Extended Support Release).

In this guide, we'll be comparing Firefox to Firefox ESR. This will include a look into why some distros come with ESR instead of the normal version of the browser, and also what the pros and cons are of both browsers.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • What is Firefox ESR?
  • Why do some distros use Firefox ESR?
  • How to download Firefox ESR

For one reason or another, Mozilla Firefox may not render fonts as intended on all Linux systems. Fortunately, Firefox gives us a lot of control over the font configuration, so we can fine tune these settings until it looks better.

In this guide, we'll show you how to access Firefox's font settings to improve rendering. We'll also go over some more advanced options in case the usual ones don't work for you.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to configure Firefox font settings
  • Advanced font settings in about:config
  • Operating system level font tweaks

If you're into a sleek and minimal aesthetic when it comes to Linux, removing the title bar in Mozilla Firefox can help you accomplish that feel. The title bar isn't really necessary anyway, since it just contains information that's already available in the title of the tabs.

In this guide, we'll show you the step by step instructions to remove the title bar in Firefox. These same steps can also be used to toggle it back on.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to remove Firefox title bar on Linux

Dark mode is all the rage these past few years, with nearly all operating systems and applications now offering the feature. Mozilla Firefox is no exception, and it's pretty simple to enable dark mode inside the web browser. This can help reduce eye strain, especially when using your PC in a dimly lit room.

In this guide, we'll take you through the step by step instructions to enable dark mode in Firefox on a Linux system. You'll also see how to select from a variety of other themes or restore the classic brighter theme.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to enable or disable dark mode (and other themes) in Firefox

The Video Acceleration API, developed by Intel, has been enjoying widespread support in a variety of software, including the latest versions of Mozilla Firefox. The VA-API is an API for hardware acceleration that allows a computer to offload video decoding and encoding tasks to a system's video card, a task that historically has taken place in the CPU.

In this guide, we'll talk about Firefox's VA-API setting. This will include a brief introduction to what it is and how it works, as well as how to enable or disable the setting on a Linux system. Keep reading if you want to give the VA-API setting a try, potentially speeding up your web browser's video playback a great deal.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • What is Video Acceleration API in Firefox?
  • How to enable or disable VA-API

Google Chrome is a very popular, yet closed source web browser. This makes it a little tricky to install on a Linux system, as it's pretty much never included by default on any distro, and usually not available for installation from official repositories. Contrast this to Mozilla Firefox, which is open source and ubiquitous across the most popular Linux distros.

There's still a Linux version of Chrome that's developed by Google, you just have to jump through an extra hoop or two to get it installed. In this guide, we'll go over the step by step instructions to install Google Chrome on all the most common Linux distros.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install Google Chrome on Debian, Red Hat, and Arch Linux based systems
Google Chrome installed and running on a Linux system
Google Chrome installed and running on a Linux system

Users of Linux have many choices when it comes to web browsers. Among the top choices are Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, along with the closely related Chromium browser. In this guide, we'll go over a comparison of the three browsers, with the goal of allowing you to make an informed decision about which browser you should use.

This guide will include a basic review of the browsers, highlights on their features and differences, history, pros and cons, etc. Keep reading to learn more and find out which one works best for you.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • Web browsers on Linux
  • Firefox vs. Chrome/Chromium
  • Which browser should I use?

Keeping your Linux system's software up to date is always a good practice to follow, and Mozilla Firefox is no exception. Having the latest updates means that you have access to the newest features, bug fixes, and security patches for your web browser.

In this guide, we'll show you how to update Firefox on all the most popular Linux distributions. Firefox normally takes care of updates by itself and doesn't require much user intervention, but there are still a few methods that can be used to manually update the application.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to update Firefox via browser menu
  • How to update Firefox via GUI
  • How to update Firefox via command line
  • How to update Firefox via direct download

Bloatware is a type of software which is installed by the product vendor (like Samsung) on top of the Android operating system in your mobile phone. But do you need all this extra software? The name clarifies; it makes your mobile bloated. Much of the utilities and services installed on your phone are simply not required, and at times may be annoying or consuming a fair bit of battery. Uninstalling a lot of these may buy you an extra day or two of battery power.

Uninstalling bloatware is made possible via ADB - the Android Debug Bridge, which is included in the stock Android SDK (Software Development Kit) and is available as an easy install on most modern Linux distributions. Setting up ADB and configuring is not the focus of this article, and you can find detailed instructions on how to do so in our How to Use ADB Android Debug Bridge to Manage Your Android Mobile Phone article.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to remove bloatware from your Android mobile phone via ADB
  • What is likely safe to remove, and where you may run into problems
  • That bloatware cleanups are generally personal, tuned to your usage

Using a screen of a remote computer is often using VNC (Virtual Network Computing), or other remote desktop solutions. These come in both commercial and open source flavors. But how do you go about mirroring, and using, your Android mobile phone to and from your Linux desktop?

It is all possible via ADB - the Android Debug Bridge, which is included in the stock Android SDK (Software Development Kit) and is available as an easy install on most modern Linux distributions. Setting up ADB and configuring is not the focus of this article, and you can find detailed instructions on how to do so in our How to Use ADB Android Debug Bridge to Manage Your Android Mobile Phone article.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to mirror your Android mobile phone screen to your Linux based workstation
  • How to remotely control your Android mobile phone screen via ADB
  • How to remote control your mobile phone via USB and via Wi-Fi

Mobile phones have evolved a lot over recent years, and we have seen several mobile-vs-desktop management solutions like Samsung DeX for Samsung Mobile phones, and only available for Windows 7 and 10 as well as Mac. As a non-Samsung or Linux user, one may feel left out. Not so! In fact, a whole lot more power can be provided by the ADB toolset from the Android developer team! This article will introduce you the same, and we have two followup articles which describe How to Mirror Your Android Mobile Screen to Linux and How to Remove Bloatware From Your Samsung Android Mobile Phone.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install ADB on your Linux workstation
  • How to connect your phone using a physical USB cable
  • How to connect to your phone using ADB
  • How to change the setup to enable wireless access to your phone via ADB

As new innovations continue to push the envelope of what's possible on a modern PC, hardware acceleration has been finding its way into many common applications. In recent versions, Mozilla Firefox now allows users to enable hardware acceleration in the web browser's settings.

In this guide, we'll talk about Firefox's hardware acceleration. This will include a brief introduction to what it is and how it works, as well as how to enable or disable the setting on a Linux system. Keep reading if you want to give hardware acceleration a try, potentially speeding up your web browser a great deal.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • What is hardware acceleration in Firefox?
  • How to enable or disable hardware acceleration
Hardware acceleration enabled in Mozilla Firefox
Hardware acceleration enabled in Mozilla Firefox

Mozilla Firefox is one of the most popular and widely used web browsers in the world. It's available for installation on all major Linux distros, and even included as the default web browser for some Linux systems.

In this guide, we'll cover the step by step instructions on how to download and install Mozilla Firefox on the most popular Linux distros. This will include methods for installation from a distro's package manager, as well as a direct download from Mozilla's site.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install Firefox on popular Linux distros via package manager
  • How to install Firefox via direct download from Mozilla
Mozilla Firefox successfully installed on Linux
Mozilla Firefox successfully installed on Linux

In this guide, we'll show you a few different methods for fixing the Firefox is already running but is not responding error message on a Linux system.

First, let's go over a few reasons for why this error may be occurring. It's not uncommon to have an application freeze or "hang" every once in a while, so if this isn't an issue that you repeatedly have with Firefox, you can probably simply kill the process and get back to what you were doing.

On the other hand, the problem has been known to become perpetual in situations where there's an issue with the profile file. Firefox stores a user's personalizations and settings inside a "profile" that is accessed every time Firefox opens. If you're experiencing this error often, it can be helpful to create a brand new profile and import your old settings.

Follow along with our step by step guide below in order to fix this annoying error and get your web browser running smoothly again.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to fix "Firefox is already running but is not responding" error message
  • How to kill Firefox processes
  • How to launch Firefox in safe mode
  • How to remove the profile lock file
  • How to create a new Firefox profile
  • How to reinstall Firefox

Adobe Flash Player was the standard for web videos and interactive websites for many years. It's not as relevant as it once was, due to being superseded by HTML 5. However, it hasn't died out completely and you may still run across some websites that require you to have Abobe Flash installed.

In this guide, we'll be using our Ubuntu Linux system to install and enable Adobe Flash Player on various web browsers, like Firefox, Chrome, Chromium, and Opera. Follow along with the steps below to get it enabled on your own system.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install Flash Plugin (Firefox and Chrome)
  • How to install Flash Plugin (Chromium and Opera)
  • How to install Flash Plugin (browsers installed via Snap)
  • How to enable Adobe Flash in Mozilla Firefox
  • How to enable Adobe Flash in Google Chrome, Chromium, and Opera
Adobe Flash running successfully in Mozilla Firefox
Adobe Flash running successfully in Mozilla Firefox

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