How to tune Linux extended (ext) filesystems using dumpe2fs and tune2fs

The ext2, ext3 and ext4 filesystems are some of the most known and used filesystems specifically designed for Linux. The first one, ext2 (second extended filesystems) is, as its name suggests, the older of the three. It has no journal feature, which is the biggest advantage of its successor over him: ext3. Released in 2008, ext4 is the more recent, and currently the default filesystem on many Linux distributions.

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Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction

Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction

This tutorial will deal with Megatools Linux install and Basic Introduction. MEGA is one of the most famous cloud storage and file hosting services available. The service offered by the company are normally accessible via web interface or dedicated applications also on smartphone operating systems such as Android or iOS. In this article we see how to access the service from the command line via a free and open source set of tools written in Python: Megatools.

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ampache raspberry pi

Ampache Raspberry Pi installation

In this Ampache Raspberry Pi installation you will learn how to setup a web based audio/video streaming application, which allow us to access our music and videos remotely. It is a completely open source project, written in PHP. The source code is hosted on github, and at the moment of writing, the latest available release is 4.4.3. In this tutorial we see how to install it on a Raspberry Pi OS, so to create a self-hosted media server.

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How to configure DHCP on Linux

What is DHCP and how to configure DHCP server in Linux

DHCP is a networking protocol used to assign IP addresses to networked devices. In this guide, we’ll introduce you to the protocol and explain how it works. You’ll also see how to implement a DHCP server on Linux systems, and configure it for your own network.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • What is DHCP?
  • How to implement a DHCP server on major Linux distros
  • How to configure DHCP on Linux

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Send an email using Telnet

Send an email using Telnet

In this guide, we’ll show the step by step instructions to send an email using Telnet on a Linux system. This a great way to test your mail server configuration such as exim, sendmail or postfix without the need for an email client.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install Telnet on major Linux distros
  • How to send an email using Telnet protocol on Linux

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Checking the current runlevel on a Linux system

How to check a current runlevel of your Linux system

Before systemd came into existence, most major Linux distributions ran a Sys-V style init system. Sys-V used seven different “runlevels” to determine which processes to start on the system. For example, runlevel 3 was typically reserved for the command line and its related programs, whereas runlevel 5 would launch a GUI and all the processes required for it. Results may vary, depending on the distro in question.

These days, the vast majority of Linux distros have adopted systemd as their init system. Some distros still use Sys-V, where the implementation of runlevels as described above still exists. On systemd systems, the concept of runlevels is still alive, but they have been adapted into systemd “targets.”

Remnants of Sys-V still exist on some systems, where commands like runlevel still work. But some modern systemd distros have eradicated this support completely. In this guide, we’ll show you how to check the current runlevel on Linux.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to check the current runlevel

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Saving the output of a PostgreSQL query to text file

Saving an output of PostgreSQL query to a text file

When using PostgreSQL on Linux, there may be times that you wish to save the output of a query. Normally, the output appears on your screen. It’s possible to redirect this output to a file instead, which would allow you to view it later. In this guide, we’ll show you how to save the output of a PostgreSQL query to a file.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to save the output of a PostgreSQL query to a file

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Configuring SSH login without password between two systems

SSH login without password

If you ever get tired of typing in your SSH password, we’ve got good news. It’s possible to configure public key authentication on Linux systems, which allows you to connect to a server through SSH, without using a password.

The best part is, using key authentication is actually more secure than typing in a password each time. This is in addition to being far more convenient. It also allows you to automate certain tasks, such as rsync scripts or other Bash scripts that utilize SSH, SCP, etc.

The process for setting up key authentication involves generating RSA keys on one system, then copying the key to a remote host. This works on any Linux distribution and is a short and easy process. Follow along with the instructions below as we take you through the step by step guide to configure passwordless SSH on Linux.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • Generate RSA keys and transfer to remote system
  • How to login with SSH without a password

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ansible-logo

Ansible tutorial for beginners on Linux

A system administrator, in the vast majority of cases, has to take care of more than one server, so he often has to perform repetitive tasks on all of them. In these cases automation is a must. Ansible is an open source software owned by Red Hat; it is written in the Python programming lanaguage, and it is a provisioning and configuration management software which help us in the aforementioned cases. In this tutorial we will see how to install it and the basic concepts behind its usage.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install Ansible on the most used Linux distributions
  • How to configure Ansible
  • What is the Ansible inventory
  • What are the Ansible modules
  • How to run a module from the command line
  • How to create and run a playbook
ansible-logo

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Configuring and testing a BIND nameserver on Linux

Linux DNS server BIND configuration

The BIND DNS software is one of the most reliable and proven ways to configure name resolution on a Linux system. Having been around since the 1980s, it remains the most popular Domain Name Server (DNS) currently in use. This article serves as a quick configuration manual of a Linux DNS server using BIND.

This article is not an introduction to DNS or an explanation of how the protocol works. Rather we will simply concentrate on a simple configuration of a custom zone and config file for a given domain / host supporting www and mail services. Follow along with the instructions below to get BIND DNS set up and configured on your own server.

WARNING
Before you proceed with the installation and configuration of BIND nameserver, make sure that BIND DNS server is exactly what you want. Default setup and execution of BIND on Debian or Ubuntu may take around 200MB of RAM with no zones added to the config file. Unless you reduce the memory usage of a BIND via various BIND “options” config settings, be prepared to have some spare RAM available just for this service. This fact is even more important if you pay for your own VPS server.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install BIND on major Linux distros
  • How to create a DNS zone file
  • How to configure address to name mappings
  • How to check BIND zone file and configuration
  • How to start or restart the BIND DNS service
  • How to test a BIND configuration with dig command

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Using a custom Red Hat repository - in this case from a Red Hat DVD

Creating a Redhat package repository

If your Red Hat server is not connected to the official RHN repositories, you will need to configure your own private repository which you can later use to install packages. The procedure of creating a Red Hat Linux repository is quite a simple task. In this article, we will show you how to create a local file Red Hat repository as well as a remote HTTP repository.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to use official Red Hat DVD as repository
  • How to create a local file Red Hat repository
  • How to create a remote HTTP Red Hat repository

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