When it comes to IP addresses on AlmaLinux, you have two main options for how you configure your network interfaces. You can either obtain an IP address automatically with DHCP, or configure the system to use a static IP address, which never changes.

In this guide, we'll show how to configure a static IP address on AlmaLinux. This can be done either through GUI or command line, and we'll be going over both methods. Once a static IP address is configured, it won't change again unless you manually change the IP address later, or turn DHCP on. You can follow this guide whether you've migrated from CentOS to AlmaLinux or have performed a normal AlmaLinux installation.

DID YOU KNOW?
You can also configure your DHCP server (or router) to assign your AlmaLinux system a static IP address. This means that your system would still use DHCP, but the server or router will reserve the same IP for the MAC address of your computer's network interface. Instructions for this will vary, depending on your network environment and DHCP server.
In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to configure a static IP address via GNOME GUI
  • How to set a static IP address by directly editing an interface file
  • How to set a static IP address using the nmcli utility
  • How to set a static IP address using nmtui
Configuring a static IP address on AlmaLinux
Configuring a static IP address on AlmaLinux

Like all Linux distros, it's important to keep your AlmaLinux system up to date in order to make sure that you have the latest security updates and newest features. Updating the system usually involves simply upgrading all installed packages to their latest versions.

Since AlmaLinux is a fork of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, there are also system upgrades to a new version every few years, coinciding with the new RHEL releases. This type of update is a full system upgrade, and it's different than simply keeping AlmaLinux up to date.

In this article, we'll cover updating a AlmaLinux system on a per package basis and upgrading the entire operating system. This can be done via command line and GUI. Both methods will be shown in this guide, so you can pick whichever is easier for you.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to update AlmaLinux packages via command line
  • How to update AlmaLinux packages via GNOME GUI
Updating AlmaLinux system packages
Updating AlmaLinux system packages

Most Linux distributions, especially the user friendly ones, connect to your network and internet right away, when they first boot up.

This is thanks to DHCP, a protocol that the system uses to lease a local IP address from your router. However, some RHEL based distros, including AlmaLinux, don't have this feature enabled out of the box.

In this guide, we'll show you the step by step instructions for a couple different methods of connecting to a network automatically in AlmaLinux. Specifically, this will enable DHCP on a network interface, either temporarily or persistently.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to connect to network via DHCP temporarily
  • How to configure persistent DHCP network configuration via command line and GUI
Configuring automatic connection to a network on AlmaLinux
Configuring automatic connection to a network on AlmaLinux

AlmaLinux is an enterprise-ready Linux distribution forked from Red Hat Enterprise Linux. It's a very stable operating system that's meant especially for production envrionments (servers), but you can also install a GUI on AlmaLinux and use it as a desktop operating system.

In this guide, we'll be going through the step by step instructions of installing AlmaLinux. You can follow along with our steps whether you're installing AlmaLinux on a desktop or server. If you already have CentOS installed and want to switch to AlmaLinux, please see our guide on migrating from CentOS to AlmaLinux.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • Which edition of AlmaLinux to download
  • How to install AlmaLinux
AlmaLinux installation
AlmaLinux installation

With the change of CentOS Linux from an enterprise-stable operating system to an upstream development branch of RHEL, new projects have rushed to fill the gap left in its wake.

The distros you've probably already heard of are AlmaLinux and Rocky Linux, the two top contenders to act as a viable replacement for CentOS.

For the CentOS users that have decided to switch to another RHEL fork, rather than distro hop entirely, they'll face the question of, "Which distro should I use? AlmaLinux or Rocky?"

In this guide, we'll compare AlmaLinux and Rocky Linux across a few key areas. We'll weigh their pros and cons, see how they stack up against each other, and ultimately give you enough information to help you decide which one you should use.

The main motivation behind the creation of AlmaLinux was to be a viable replacement for CentOS Linux at the time of its shift from an enterprise-stable operating system to an upstream development branch of RHEL.

Now that AlmaLinux is released, it still leaves CentOS users wondering how to switch operating systems. Ideally, this should be done as seamlessly as possible, to prevent downtime, loss of data, etc. In this guide, we'll show you the step by step instructions to migrate from CentOS to AlmaLinux with just a few commands.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to migrate from CentOS to AlmaLinux
Completing the merge from CentOS to AlmaLinux
Completing the merge from CentOS to AlmaLinux

GNOME is the default desktop environment on AlmaLinux, but only if you opt for the full installation of the operating system. Other installations don't include any GUI by default. If you've chosen a minimal install but don't want to be limited to just the command line, you can install the GNOME desktop environment in a few simple commands.

In this guide, we'll show you the step by step instructions to install the GNOME GUI on AlmaLinux. Follow along with us on your own system to get it setup.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install GNOME desktop environment on AlmaLinux
  • How to make GNOME launch by default upon system boot
Running GNOME desktop environment on AlmaLinux
Running GNOME desktop environment on AlmaLinux

AlmaLinux is a Linux distribution based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and maintained by CloudLinux, a company that provides server hosting and Linux software. For other most popular Linux distributions, please visit our dedicated Linux download page.

MIGRATE YOUR CENTOS TO ALMALINUX
Follow our guide to learn how to migrate CentOS to AlmaLinux, if you prefer convert your existing operating system instead of starting with a new AlmaLinux installation.

The motivation behind Alma's release is to serve as a viable replacement for CentOS at the time of its shift from an enterprise-stable operating system to an upstream development branch of RHEL. Users can even switch from CentOS to AlmaLinux with just one command that will swap repositories and keys.

AlmaLinux functions very similarly to RHEL, but it's completely free. It's marketed to users and companies that need enterprise-level stability in a Fedora-like operating system. In other words, companies that want to use Red Hat but don't want to pay the subscription fee and/or don't need tech support can use AlmaLinux to fill the gap.

Being based on RHEL naturally makes AlmaLinux more geared towards servers and workstations, though it can still work well as a desktop operating system for some people. The full installation comes with the GNOME desktop environment and proves easy enough to use, but Linux newcomers will find a more welcoming experience in a user friendly distro like Ubuntu.

SSL encryption for your website is extremely important. It prevents man in the middle attacks, helps your page's SEO, and browsers like Firefox won't warn users that your site is insecure.

Best of all, you can get all these advantages for just a few minutes of your time. In this guide, we'll show you how to install Let's Encrypt on Centos 8, and how to use it to configure SSL encryption for your website. In a few steps, your site will become accessible via HTTPS, with HTTP links (optionally) redirecting to the secure protocol as well.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install Let's Encrypt
  • How to configure Let's Encrypt SSL

GNU/Linux filesystem permissions and rights are the basis of the system's security, and one of it's principles is the clear separation of rights to files and folders. In a heavily multiuser environment, such as a school's server, file rights prevent a user by default to accidentally delete or overwrite another's documents. However, there are use cases where multiple users need to access (read, write, and even delete) other user's files - such may be the case in the above mentioned school server, where students work on the same project. In this section of RHCSA exam preparation we will learn how to create an environment for such collaboration, using the setgid (set groupID) technique. Note that while we perform these steps on a recent operating system, the setgid isn't a new thing, and you will find it in any and all distributions.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to add users to a supplementary group
  • How to use set-GID on a directory
  • How to check proper ownership within the set-GID directory
  • How to use the special directory as a member of the group

firewalld is a front-end for the built in netfilter firewall on Linux systems. The main advantage of firewalld over using raw nftables/iptables commands is that it's easier to use, especially for more complex firewall features like timed rules. In this regard, it's similar to the uncomplicated firewall (ufw) that comes installed by default on Ubuntu systems.

On CentOS, firewalld is the default firewall interface and should already be installed on your system. In this guide, we'll take you through the installation of firewalld on CentOS, which includes some basic usage commands so you can get started managing the firewall.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install and update firewalld
  • firewalld basic usage commands

Like all Linux distros, it's important to keep your CentOS system up to date in order to make sure that you have the latest security updates and newest features. Updating the system usually involves simply upgrading all installed packages to their latest versions. Every few years, there's a new version of CentOS released, which requires a more involved update process to install.

In this article, we'll cover updating a CentOS system on a per package basis and upgrading the entire operating system. This can be done via command line and GUI. Both methods will be shown in this guide, so you can pick whichever is easier for you.

The process for upgrading a CentOS system is a little different depending on which version you have installed. The latest version of Centos has moved to the dnf package manager. Previous to Centos 8, yum was the package manager used. Regardless of which version you're running, we'll show you the proper commands so you can update your system.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to update CentOS packages via command line
  • How to update CentOS packages via GUI
  • How to upgrade entire CentOS system

Red Hat Enterprise Linux is a commercial Linux distribution built for powering the servers of corporations and data centers. It's a robust distro with the features and stability that businesses crave for high availability and predictability.

The big appeal of Red Hat, though, is its support system. That's the main thing you're paying for, after all. If something doesn't operate as expected, businesses want someone to turn to for support so they can face as little downtime as possible. Red Hat experts are only a phone call away for subscribers.

The support feature is what really sets Red Hat apart from other Linux distributions that could also perform the same job very well, such as CentOS, Fedora, and OpenSUSE. For other most popular Linux distributions please visit our dedicated linux download page.

Red Hat offers training and certification programs to prospective Linux system administrators. This is another big plus for businesses, as they can buy training for their employees or vet new recruits by their certifications. Such training and certifications are rare to find in the Linux world, being that Linux distros are mostly free and run by a community of volunteers.

If you are a system administrator looking to get into Red Hat, most or all of your experience with CentOS and Fedora Server should transfer over to Red Hat, since the three distributions are closely related.

CentOS is one of the leading Linux distributions available. It's developed by The CentOS Project, which is an affiliate of Red Hat. As CentOS is based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, it's naturally more geared toward servers and workstations, though it can still work well as a desktop operating system for some people. For other most popular Linux distributions please visit our dedicated linux download page.

CentOS excels at being very stable and predictable, the exact qualities you'd hope to find in a server OS. It's very similar to RHEL in most respects except that it's completely free. If a user or organization needs a reliable distribution and can do without the commercial support that RHEL provides, CentOS is a perfect choice.

Apache Hadoop is an open source framework used for distributed storage as well as distributed processing of big data on clusters of computers which runs on commodity hardwares. Hadoop stores data in Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) and the processing of these data is done using MapReduce. YARN provides API for requesting and allocating resource in the Hadoop cluster.

The Apache Hadoop framework is composed of the following modules:
  • Hadoop Common
  • Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS)
  • YARN
  • MapReduce

This article explains how to install Hadoop Version 2 on RHEL 8 or CentOS 8. We will install HDFS (Namenode and Datanode), YARN, MapReduce on the single node cluster in Pseudo Distributed Mode which is distributed simulation on a single machine. Each Hadoop daemon such as hdfs, yarn, mapreduce etc. will run as a separate/individual java process.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to add users for Hadoop Environment
  • How to install and configure the Oracle JDK
  • How to configure passwordless SSH
  • How to install Hadoop and configure necessary related xml files
  • How to start the Hadoop Cluster
  • How to access NameNode and ResourceManager Web UI

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