How to make a bootable USB from an ISO in Linux

How to make a bootable USB from an ISO in Linux

The purpose of this tutorial is to make a bootable USB drive from an ISO file. USB drives have recently overtaken CDs and DVDs as the primary media of physically distributed software. It is now a common task for system administrators and normal users to install operating systems and software via USB. When you download a Linux distro, chances are that it will come as an ISO file and you will need to burn it to USB in order to install Linux on a computer. This allows you to boot directly into the Linux installer. Similarly, we can also put other software on the USB drive, assuming that the installer is distributed as an ISO file.

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How to check USB devices on Raspberry Pi

How to check USB devices on Raspberry Pi

Since the Raspberry Pi is frequently accessed remotely, such as through an SSH or VNC connection, we can’t always take a peek at the device to see which USB devices are physically connected to it. Furthermore, it can be useful to query the USB ports from the system itself, just to see if the devices or connections are actually being detected. In this tutorial, you will see how to check the USB devices that are connected to a Raspberry Pi.

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Using a USB Drive with Your Raspberry Pi: Tips and Tricks

Using a USB Drive with Your Raspberry Pi: Tips and Tricks

A USB drive is an easy way to give yourself some extra storage space on your Raspberry Pi, since the micro SD card often does not have enough space to hold all the necessary files we need to keep. Using a USB drive is also a handy way to quickly transfer files to your Raspberry Pi from another device, or vice versa. It is often necessary to do a little configuration before using a USB drive, such as formatting the device, mounting it, etc. In this tutorial, we will go over some tips and trick for using a USB drive with a Raspberry Pi.

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Boot Your Raspberry Pi from a USB: A Tutorial

Boot Your Raspberry Pi from a USB: A Tutorial

Default behavior for a Raspberry Pi is to boot from the micro SD card. However, this behavior can be changed via the Raspberry Pi imager tool, where we can change the boot order for the device. This allows us to configure our Raspberry Pi to prioritize booting from USB before micro SD card. If the USB port contains nothing bootable, then it will resort to the micro SD card. In this tutorial, you will see how to boot a Raspberry Pi from USB.

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How to create a custom fedora live image

How to create a custom Fedora live image with Lorax

Fedora is one of the most popular Linux distributions: it is sponsored by Red Hat, but its development is community-driven. While the default version of Fedora ships with the GNOME desktop environment (it is probably the ideal choice if you want to use a vanilla version of the latter), there are many alternative spins available, which allows us to try a variety of desktop environments such as XFCE or KDE Plasma. In few easy steps it is even possible to build and try a custom Fedora live image.

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How to format USB with exFAT on Linux

How to format USB with exFAT on Linux

exFAT stands for Extensible File Allocation Table and is a format made by Microsoft for use on devices like USB flash drives. In general, you do not hear a lot about exFAT these days, but it remains a viable format that is compatible with Windows, MacOS, and Linux, so it is a good choice for a flash drive that you plan on using with a variety of different systems. Some manufacturers even use exFAT as the default format for their SD cards or other products.

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Bash and DD: Testing Flash Drive Speed with a Simple Script

Flash drives are commonly used for storing and transferring data, but their speed can vary depending on the device and the environment in which it is used. If you’re looking to measure the speed of your flash drive, you can use a simple script written in bash and using the dd command. In this article, we’ll explain how to write and run a bash script that will test the read and write speed of your flash drive, and provide an overview of how the script works. Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced Linux user, this script is an easy and efficient way to measure the performance of your flash drive.

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How to install Ubuntu on USB Stick

How to install Ubuntu on USB Stick

Installing Ubuntu Linux onto a USB stick will allow you to have a portable operating sysem that you can plug into any computer. This differs from a live environment USB, as installing Ubuntu directly to a USB stick will create a persistent operating system, the same way it does when you install to a typical hard disk. However, the process of installing Ubuntu to USB is not the same as a usual hard drive.

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How to partition USB drive in Linux

How to partition USB drive in Linux

In order to access a USB drive on Linux, it needs to have one or more partitions on it. Since USB drives are usually relatively small, and only used for temporary storage or to easily transfer files, the vast majority of users will choose to configure just one partition that spans the entire USB disk. However, you can also logically separate the USB drive into different sections if you wanted to use multiple partitions.

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Burn ISO to USB in Linux

Burn ISO to USB in Linux

The purpose of this tutorial is to show how to burn an ISO file to a USB drive. USB drives have recently overtaken CDs and DVDs as the primary media of physically distributed software. It is now a common task for system administrators and normal users to install operating systems and software via USB.

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