Ubuntu 22.04 Features and Release Date

Ubuntu 22.04 Features and Release Date

In this article you will learn about some Ubuntu 22.04 features of the upcoming Ubuntu stable release. Canonical’s latest iteration to the Ubuntu operating system is Ubuntu 22.04 Jammy Jellyfish, scheduled for release on April 21, 2022. This is an LTS (long term support) release – the type of release that Canonical only publishes every two years, and continues to support for the next five.

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CentOS Linux

CentOS vs CentOS Stream

Up until a late 2020 announcement from Red Hat, CentOS Linux had a longstanding reputation as a dependable and enterprise-class Linux distribution. And now, the main purpose of CentOS is shifting. Along with that comes a name change to CentOS Stream.

In this article, we’ll talk about this change of direction for CentOS, and what it means for the huge community of users and businesses that have relied on the distro for years. We’ll also see what’s next, as many users are left scrambling for a replacement so they can avoid switching to CentOS Stream.

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Ubuntu Linux

Best Linux distro for developers

Linux inherently works well for coding and testing software. For developers and programmers, almost any Linux distro will be a good fit. When it comes to picking a distro for developing, the biggest factor is just going to be personal preference. Even so, some distros offer certain features that developers may find particularly helpful for their work.

With so many choices available, the task of choosing a distribution can be overwhelming. At the same time, jumping ship to “distro hop” is very easy to do, and shouldn’t be discouraged, as it gives you an idea of what else is available. We aim to make your choice a little easier with this guide, where we list our top picks of Linux distros for developers.

Join us as we go over our top eight picks of Linux distros, presented in no particular order. Outside of this list, there are still many other good distros that you can try. And it’s important to remember that there is no wrong choice. Let the countdown begin.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • Best Linux distros for developers

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Comparison of major Linux package management systems

Comparison of major Linux package management systems

Introduction

One of the major differences between various Linux distributions is package management. Many times, this is the reason somebody steers away from one distribution to another, because he/she doesn’t like the way software is installed or because there is software needed that isn’t available in the distro’s repositories. If you are a beginner in the Linux world and are wondering about the differences between distributions, this will be a good start. If you’ve only used one or two distributions for some time and you want to see what’s on the other side of the fence, this article also might be for you. Finally, if you need a good comparison and/or a reminder about major PM systems, you’ll find something interesting too. You will learn the most important things a user expects from a PM system, like install/uninstall, search and other advanced options. We don’t expect some special knowledge on your part, just some general Linux concepts.

The approach

We chose as terms for the comparison some popular systems from popular distributions, and those will be dpkg/apt*, rpm/yum, pacman and Portage. The first is used in Debian-based systems, rpm is used in Fedora, OpenSUSE or Mandriva, but yum is Fedora/Red Hat only, so we will focus on that.Gentoo is a source-based distribution, you will be able to see how things are done both in binary and source distributions, for a more complete comparison. Bear in mind that we will talk about the higher-level interfaces to package management, e.g. yum instead of rpm or apt* instead of dpkg, but we will not cover graphical tools like Synaptic, because we feel that the CLI tools are more powerful and usable in any environment, be it graphical or console-only.

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netbootcd grub

One CD disk, multiple Linux distributions: Netboot CD

Introduction

Every Linux user, after a while, starts creating a toolbox that he/she takes with him/her everywhere. However, that depends on the task at hand. You might need to install a distribution, you might just need a livecd, doing security-related work or just backup. And so the toolbox gets bigger and bigger, thus becoming less and less convenient. The subject of today’s article is NetbootCD. NetbootCD is not a supplement for a live Linux environment, but rather it is designed to help you install multiple Linux distributions using a single multiboot disk as oppose to requirement of 7 Linux installation disks.
In this sense NetbootCD is a CD disk that will allow you to netinstall various distributions by offering you a simple menu so you can choose distro/version and other simple options. From this reason a decent Internet connection is absolute must. You will only need the knowledge to install your distribution of choice, which nowadays is a walk in the park, with simple and easy to use installers present in many Linux distributions. We will show you how to use the NetbootCD and also how to hack it in order to add more distributions to the list, provided you have some scripting knowledge. Actually, you can use the disk also as a basic live Linux distribution, but more on that later.

Getting NetbootCD

NetbootCD is based on Tiny Core Linux, so you won’t have to get some huge ISO. One can download disk images and put it on a CD. There is also an option to put it on floppies, but that will not be dealt with here, since floppies are error-prone and almost extinct. The above link will guide you, however, should you really want to choose the floppy way. We recommend at least 512 MB of memory, more with Fedora, because the kernel and initrd images of the distros you choose will be downloaded to RAM. Now, let’s see what we get with NetbootCD.

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Installing and using gentoo linux

Installing and using Gentoo Linux: Getting Started Guide for Beginners

Introduction

Installing and using gentoo linuxIf you ask around about Gentoo, chances are you will get mixed reviews : some will say it’s a waste of time, others will say it’s only for ubergeeks, yet others will tell you it’s the only way, but no one can deny the power that Gentoo offers in terms of choices and speed. Gentoo is a rolling release distribution, which means it has no release numbers and it’s updated continuously.Gentoo is also a source-based distribution, which means that everything you install you must compile first. What Gentoo is not : it certainly isn’t for everyone. If you prefer the comfort of binary package managers that install desired software on-the-fly, if you like to install your distro in an hour or so, then you might not like Gentoo. That being said, if you’re curious, aren’t afraid of the command line and some compilation, if you want to have your system just the way you want it or you just want to be more 1337, this article is just what you need. You will learn how to install, what to install, how to get the most out of your system and of course have some fun in the process. We must warn you before we start : Gentoo has some of the best written documentation of all the Linux distributions and this article cannot and does not want to take its place, by no means. Although you will have a working Gentoo system after going through our tutorial, you are advised to read the handbook and all other sections of general interest, like Portage (the software management tool), for example. That said, let’s get ready and start installing Gentoo.

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Making use of your older hardware with Linux/BSD

Introduction

Some of you may wonder what is the purpose of this article. First, because hardware nowadays is pretty cheap, you don’t need older hardware anymore. Second, there are some articles across the Internet dealing with this already. The answer to the first problem is: well, you’ll see in the article. The answer to the second is we have some experience with older hardware first-hand, and we found it to be very useful to this day, so we want to share this with you. Older hardware, PC or not, is to be found everywhere, sometimes for free, and you can get to it easily. You will get some ideas from this article, but of course we don’t say the following list is exhaustive. Only your imagination sets the limit. The only knowledge we expect from you is to have some idea what you want to do. If you don’t yet, our article may be of help.

The hardware

Before we start, there are some variables that need some comments. First, the word “older” means different things for different people. To some, it may mean a 6 year-old AMD Athlon processor and 1GB of RAM. To others, “older” may be a PentiumII with 128 MB RAM. This article is mainly focused on the latter part, meaning really old hardware that’s still of some use with Open Source operating systems. Of course, if you have something more powerful, even better. The other variable is the hardware. People can find an old SPARC machine with < 100$ that is still usable, depending of course on what you want to do with it. The places you can find such machines, SPARC, SGI or Intel-based are Ebay, some local shop that sells older computers or even your friendly sysadmin that can’t wait to get rid of old machines. Take note that non-Intel machines will be more expensive, so think twice if you really need some exotic piece of hardware.

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Ubuntu GNOME Desktop

How To Choose The Best Linux Distro

Introduction

Choosing a Linux distribution can be one of the most difficult things for a Linux user. There are so many excellent options, and they all have their own unique strong suits.

There are also constant updates, news, and general community chatter that muddy the waters even more, making the process much less of a direct route. However, there are a couple of questions that you can ask yourself in choosing a distribution that help clear things up. It’s also important to remember that there usually isn’t a wrong answer. Every distribution is good. Sure, running Arch on your enterprise scale production deployment probably isn’t the best idea, but it’s still technically possible. It’s all about picking a distribution that fits around that sweet spot of what you want and need.

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Linux Mint

The Best Linux Distros of 2018

Every year, the question pops up; which Linux distribution is best? The reason that question persists the way it does is because there is no singular concrete answer. Most distributions are purpose built for certain situations, and even when they aren’t, there are bound to be conditions that they’re better and worse in.

This list attempts to pin down the best distributions for common use cases and situations. These are by no means the only options, but they are arguably the best as of now. Things in the Linux world always change, so keep an eye out for new developments.

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Linux Mint

The Best Linux Distros For Beginners

Everyone needs to start somewhere, and Linux is no different. Even though it became a meme, telling newcomers to install Gentoo isn’t very productive, and it harms the community as a whole.

There are distributions that work to make themselves accessible to people of every skill level and technical aptitude. They’re often called “Beginner distributions”, but they aren’t just for beginners. Actually, any one of these choices would be great for everyone, but they’re also the best places for newbies to start.

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Lubuntu/Xubuntu

10 Best Lightweight Linux Distributions For Older Computers

One of Linux’s biggest selling points has always been its ability to trim down and use as few resources as possible. Linux can bring old computers back from the dead and make them fully functional again with less resource intensive systems.

There are plenty of great distributions out there that aim to be as lightweight as possible, tailoring themselves to lower powered machines. This list explores ten of the best possibilities in that category.

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