perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale error message on Linux

Falling back to the standard locale – Solution

If you are trying to use the perl command in your terminal or execute a script coded in the language, you may encounter the Falling back to the standard locale error. This indicates that your Linux system is missing a particular software package that Perl relies on, or the software has become corrupted or misconfigured. In this tutorial, we will show you how to remedy the error and get your perl command working again.

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Pax command examples on Linux

Pax command examples on Linux

pax is an archive utility somewhere between cpio and tar. This is just because it is independent of the specific archive format, and supports a wide variety of different archive formats. It can perform simple tasks as creating a compressed archive of a selected directory or it can as much easily create a daily incremental backup.

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What is my processor architecture?

What is my processor architecture?

Knowing the architecture of your system’s processor is essential when picking an operating system to download and install. Certain editions of Linux and other operating systems are typically only made to work with a certain architecture, whether that be x86 (32 bit), x86-64 (64 bit), ARM (in the case of Raspberry Pi systems), etc. Furthermore, software that you are interested in running may only be designed to work with a particular architecture.

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Check information of kernel module on Linux

Check information of kernel module on Linux

Every time a Linux system is booted, there are a number of kernel modules that will be loaded by the system and used to provide additional support for filesystems, new hardware, and many other things. Obtaining information about particular kernel modules may a be an important troubleshooting skill. In this tutorial, we will explain how to obtain module information such as description, dependency, author or relevant object file name using the modinfo command and its various options.

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Detach process from parent on Linux

Detach process from parent on Linux

Every program you run from your working shell is, to the Linux system, regarded as a process. Each process, except init, has its parent identified by PPID (parent process ID). When you start a process using your current shell, the shell itself becomes a parent for your newly started process. The trouble with this approach is that this may not always be desirable, since when the parent process is terminated, its child dies with it.

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Resolving the bash: netstat: command not found error on Debian/Ubuntu Linux

inxi installation and usage on Ubuntu/Debian

The inxi Linux command can be used to see various system information and other handy bits of data right from your terminal. The command is ordinarily not installed by default. However, it is a small software package that provides access to the command, and it proves especially useful to system administrators and power users.

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Retrieve Weather information using Linux command line

Retrieve Weather information using Linux command line

Although most Linux users will use a GUI tool to retrieve weather information, it is also possible to do get a weather forecast from the command line. Whether you are stubborn command line user or you wish to automate flower watering using your Linux system and cron, there are several different options that can do the job. Some tools even allow you to retrieve information such as current outside temperature, wind, pressure, humidity, altitude, and more, directly from your Linux terminal.

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Resolving the bash: netstat: command not found error on Debian/Ubuntu Linux

bash: netstat: command not found – Debian/Ubuntu Linux

The netstat Linux command is used by system administrators to see information about network connections. Netstat is a powerful utility that can print network connections, routing tables, interface statistics, masquerade connections, and multicast memberships. It has been superseded by the ss command in recent years, but is still a viable tool for network diagnostics and troubleshooting.

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Ubuntu 22.04 GPG error: The following signatures couldn’t be verified

Ubuntu 22.04 GPG error: The following signatures couldn’t be verified

The Ubuntu 22.04 GPG error: The following signatures couldn't be verified is the most common error when attempting to include third party package repositories to the apt package manager. The GPG error should rather be treated as a warning against potential package installation from unknown sources. Therefore, the GPG error message prompts the user to verify and manually import the third party signature belonging to relevant package developer.

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Managing kernel modules on Linux

Basic Linux Kernel commands for module administration

The kernel of a Linux system is the core that everything else in the operating system relies on. The functionality of the kernel can be extended by adding modules to it by use of a specific Linux kernel commands. As such, a user can fine tune their kernel settings by enabling or disabling modules. This level of granular control is one of the many reasons why users love Linux in the first place.

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