How to use curl to get public IP address

How to use curl to get public IP address

The curl command on Linux systems is commonly used to download and upload files to or from a remote server. Another interesting thing we can use it for is to determine the public IP address of our system. To do this, we can use curl to query websites that are configured to do nothing more than return the IP address of whichever system is connecting to it. This is one of the quickest and easiest ways to get your public IP address on the Linux command line. In this tutorial, you will see how to use the curl command to get your system’s public IP address.

Read more

How to make a bootable USB from an ISO in Linux

How to make a bootable USB from an ISO in Linux

The purpose of this tutorial is to make a bootable USB drive from an ISO file. USB drives have recently overtaken CDs and DVDs as the primary media of physically distributed software. It is now a common task for system administrators and normal users to install operating systems and software via USB. When you download a Linux distro, chances are that it will come as an ISO file and you will need to burn it to USB in order to install Linux on a computer. This allows you to boot directly into the Linux installer. Similarly, we can also put other software on the USB drive, assuming that the installer is distributed as an ISO file.

Read more

Checking the status of NGINX on Ubuntu

How to check NGINX status on Ubuntu

After installing NGINX on Ubuntu Linux, either as a web server or reverse proxy server, you’ll need to learn the basics of administrating the service. In this tutorial, we’ll show how to check the status of NGINX on Ubuntu. This will give you information about the state of the NGINX service, to help you determine if it’s running, accepting connections successfully, etc. We’ll also explain the various states of NGINX, so you know what to do with the information that’s presented.

Read more

Change IP address on Ubuntu Server

Change IP address on Ubuntu Server

You have two options when configuring the IP address on your Ubuntu Server, and that is either a static IP address or DHCP. A static IP address allows you to manually select your IP address by configuring it on the Linux system, whereas DHCP relies on the router or DHCP server to lease you an IP address – either a reserved one or the next available one that is currently free, depending on the setup.

Read more

Installing and using the ifconfig command on Debian

How to install missing ifconfig command on Linux

Most of us longtime Linux users have the ifconfig command seared into our brain, after years of repetitive use. It comes as a shock to some when they type the command and are met with an error message (ifconfig command not found). Indeed, the command has become deprecated, but it’s still possible to install the ifconfig command. The newer alternative is the ip command, which has new functions but also a different syntax that takes some getting used to.

Read more

Ubuntu 22.04 network configuration

Ubuntu 22.04 Network Setup

Network setup for Ubuntu can range from easy to hard, depending on what you’re trying to do. Canonical prides itself on making their Ubuntu 22.04 Jammy Jellyfish Linux operating system very simple to use, even if you do not have a lot of technical knowledge. Despite its simplicity, Ubuntu has a lot going on under the hood to make things work, including networking configuration that allows you to connect to local devices or servers across the world.

Read more

Fixing the 'Permission Denied' Error on Linux

Fixing the ‘Permission Denied’ Error on Linux

If you receive the Permission Denied error on your Linux system, it usually means that your user account does not have the proper permissions on the file or directory you are trying to interact with. All files and directories in the Linux file system have user and group permissions attached to them that delegate access to read, write, or execute the file. These permissions work independently of each other, so just because you are able to open a file, does not mean you can edit it.

Read more

Linux IP forwarding

Linux IP forwarding – How to Disable/Enable using net.ipv4.ip_forward

It may be necessary to configure Linux IP forwarding on a Linux system in certain scenarios. If the Linux server is acting as a firewall, router, or NAT device, it will need to be capable of forwarding packets that are meant for other destinations (other than itself). Linux uses the net.ipv4.ip_forward kernel variable to toggle this setting on or off.

Read more

Understanding Linux Permissions: The Differences between chmod and chown

Understanding Linux Permissions: The Differences between chmod and chown

If you are just starting to learn about file permissions on a Linux system, the chmod and chown commands will be your starting point for granting or revoking file permissions for user accounts. chmod and chown are completely different commands, yet they go hand in hand when it comes to modifying file permissions on the Linux file system. The basic summary is that chown can change the owner of a file, and chmod can change the permissions of the file, but this explanation is only scratching the surface.

Read more

Recovering from Unintended Recursive chmod on System Directories: Steps and Precautions

Recovering from Unintended Recursive chmod on System Directories: Steps and Precautions

When tinkering around in the command line terminal of your Linux system, it is important to be aware that a small mishap can have dire consequences. Most Linux commands are not very forgiving, and there is often not an easy way to “reverse” a command after it has been run, especially on a large batch of files. The chmod command is one such command that users need to be wary of, as unintentionally changing the file permissions for system directories is not reversible, except through a slow, manual process.

Read more

Explaining the Sticky Bit: What the "t" in Linux Directory Permissions Means

Explaining the Sticky Bit: What the “t” in Linux Directory Permissions Means

Most seasoned Linux users are already familiar with basic file permissions like read, write, and execute. These permissions exist on every file and administrators often need to edit such permissions in order to tighten up security or grant file access to certain users. A less common permission that you may not be as intimately familiar with is the “sticky bit.”

Read more