How to install Fedora/RHEL/CentOS via kickstart on an existing LUKS device

How to install Fedora/RHEL/CentOS via kickstart on an existing LUKS device

Kickstart installations let us easily script and replicate unattended or semi-unattended installations of Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux or CentOS. The instructions needed to install the operating system are specified, with a dedicated syntax, inside a Kickstart file which is passed to the Anaconda installer. In this tutorial we will see how to reuse an already existing LUKS (Linux Unified Keys Setup) container when performing a Kickstart installation: this is something that cannot be achieved just with Kickstart instructions and requires some extra steps.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to use an existing LUKS container when performing a Kickstart installation of Fedora, RHEL or CentOS
  • How to create and use an updates.img file to be used with the Anaconda installer.

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Installed Nvidia drivers on CentOS 7 Linux GNOME desktop

How to install the NVIDIA drivers on CentOS 7 Linux

The CentOS 7’s support for Nvidia video graphic cards comes in a form of an open source nouveau driver. In case the nouveau driver is not a sufficient solution, users can install the official Nvidia driver as a proprietary alternative. This step by steps tutorial will guide you through the entire process on Nvidia driver installation.

To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

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generate rndc and bind configuration - centos

Configure RNDC Key for Bind DNS server on CentOS 7

Objective

In order to administer DNS server (bind) from a command line, the RNDC utility needs to be correctly configured to avoid error message such as “rndc connect failed 127.0.0.1 connection refused“. The objective is to configure RNDC for Bind DNS server on CentOS 7 Linux.

Operating System and Software Versions

  • Operating System: – CentOS Linux release 7.4.1708 (Core) Linux
  • Software: – Bind 9

Requirements

Privileged access to your Ubuntu System as root or via sudo command is required.

Difficulty

EASY

Conventions

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How to check Linux version

How to check Linux Version

The common scenario is that you have been given an access to a Linux system physically or via remote login and you have no idea what Linux version is installed on this particular system. Given that many of the today’s Linux Distributions have implemented systemd as part of their core design, to check for a Linux version is in many cases relatively simple procedure.

The simplest way to check Linux version is by using the hostnamectl command without any arguments. For example the below hostnamectl command will return the Linux distribution name, version and codename in use along with the currently loaded Linux kernel version:

$ hostnamectl 
   Static hostname: x220
         Icon name: computer-laptop
           Chassis: laptop
        Machine ID: 2d4efda5efb0430faeb2087d0a335c6b
           Boot ID: f8c4a3a776a74d42878347efc2c00634
  Operating System: Debian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)
            Kernel: Linux 4.9.0-9-amd64
      Architecture: x86-64
DID YOU KNOW?

It is a common mistake to refer to the entire GNU/Linux operating system simply as Linux. The important note here is that the so called Linux is actually only the Kernel part of the system whereas GNU is the actual system as in collection of pre-compiled binaries, libraries and system tools. Both GNU and Linux kernel must function in tandem in order for the operating system to actually work.

Hence, one cannot exists without the other, so next time when you talk about your operating system and you wish to be technically correct, refer to it as GNU/Linux or simply as Lignux.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • Basic introduction to Linux package
  • How to check system architecture and Linux kernel version
  • How to check CPU architecture
  • How to check CentOS, Redhat, Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, Arch, Fedora Linux system version

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phpmyadmin-login-page

How to install phpMyAdmin on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8

PhpMyAdmin is a php web application which let us manage a MariaDB/MySQL database from an intuitive graphical interface. The application is not provided in the RHEL 8 / CentOS 8 official repositories, and is usually installed from third party sources like EPEL. Epel-8 is, however, not yet available, so in this tutorial we will see how to fetch the upstream phpMyAdmin code and install it on our system “manually”.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to download and install phpMyAdmin from source
  • How to verify the downloaded archive
  • How to access the phpMyAdmin configuration wizard

phpmyadmin-login-page

The phpMyAdmin login page

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How to install DNS server on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8 Linux

This guide will show how to install and configure a DNS Server in RHEL 8 / CentOS 8 in caching mode only or as single DNS Server, no master-slave configuration. A reverse and forward zone example is provided.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install a DNS server in RHEL 8 / CentOS 8
  • How to configure a server as caching only DNS Server
  • How to configure a server as single DNS Server

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Ansible Architecture

How to install and configure Ansible on Redhat Enterprise Linux 8

This tutorial covers step by step installation and configuration of Ansible on Redhat Enterprise Linux 8.
Ansible is the leading Open Source configuration management system. It makes it easy for administrators and operations teams to control thousands of servers from central machine without installing agents on them.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • Ansible Overview
  • Install and Configure Python
  • Set Password-less SSH
  • Install Ansible
  • Testing and Managing the Ansible

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