Developing and running an Android app on a Linux system

Get Started with Android application development using Linux and Android SDK

Developers interested in the Android mobile operating system are able to use the Android SDK and various IDE software to code applications. These apps can then be made available and marketed to Android users around the world.

There are a lot of choices when it comes to programming Android applications. Your coding environment can involve a Linux system and a variety of different IDE programs to facilitate all of the software development. The trouble here is that each Linux distribution will often have a different set of requirements to run the sofware, and a separate list of steps that need to be followed.

In this guide, we’ll go through the step by step instructions to install Android Studio – which is one of the most popular Android IDEs – on a Linux system. This will work on any distribution because we’ll be using Snap package manager to manage the installation. Love it or hate it, the Snap package manager gets your system ready for Android development very quickly, by handling all the dependencies and working identically on any distribution you’re running, whether it be Ubuntu, Debian, Red Hat, CentOS, AlmaLinux, openSUSE, or any other type of Linux system.

Follow along with us below as we setup Snap package manager, install Android Studio, and then program a Hello World Android application to verify that everything is working properly.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to setup Snap package manager
  • How to install Android Studio and SDK packages
  • How to create a Hello World test application
  • How to run an Android application on an emulated device

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How to Use ADB Android Debug Bridge to Manage Your Android Mobile Phone

How to Use ADB Android Debug Bridge to Manage Your Android Mobile Phone

Mobile phones have evolved a lot over recent years, and we have seen several mobile-vs-desktop management solutions like Samsung DeX for Samsung Mobile phones, and only available for Windows 7 and 10 as well as Mac. As a non-Samsung or Linux user, one may feel left out. Not so! In fact, a whole lot more power can be provided by the ADB toolset from the Android developer team! This article will introduce you the same, and we have two followup articles which describe How to Mirror Your Android Mobile Screen to Linux and How to Remove Bloatware From Your Samsung Android Mobile Phone.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install ADB on your Linux workstation
  • How to connect your phone using a physical USB cable
  • How to connect to your phone using ADB
  • How to change the setup to enable wireless access to your phone via ADB

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How to Mirror Your Android Mobile Screen to Linux

How to Mirror Your Android Mobile Screen to Linux

Using a screen of a remote computer is often using VNC (Virtual Network Computing), or other remote desktop solutions. These come in both commercial and open source flavors. But how do you go about mirroring, and using, your Android mobile phone to and from your Linux desktop?

It is all possible via ADB – the Android Debug Bridge, which is included in the stock Android SDK (Software Development Kit) and is available as an easy install on most modern Linux distributions. Setting up ADB and configuring is not the focus of this article, and you can find detailed instructions on how to do so in our How to Use ADB Android Debug Bridge to Manage Your Android Mobile Phone article.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to mirror your Android mobile phone screen to your Linux based workstation
  • How to remotely control your Android mobile phone screen via ADB
  • How to remote control your mobile phone via USB and via Wi-Fi

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How to Remove Bloatware From Your Samsung Android Mobile Phone

How to Remove Bloatware From Your Samsung Android Mobile Phone

Bloatware is a type of software which is installed by the product vendor (like Samsung) on top of the Android operating system in your mobile phone. But do you need all this extra software? The name clarifies; it makes your mobile bloated. Much of the utilities and services installed on your phone are simply not required, and at times may be annoying or consuming a fair bit of battery. Uninstalling a lot of these may buy you an extra day or two of battery power.

Uninstalling bloatware is made possible via ADB – the Android Debug Bridge, which is included in the stock Android SDK (Software Development Kit) and is available as an easy install on most modern Linux distributions. Setting up ADB and configuring is not the focus of this article, and you can find detailed instructions on how to do so in our How to Use ADB Android Debug Bridge to Manage Your Android Mobile Phone article.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to remove bloatware from your Android mobile phone via ADB
  • What is likely safe to remove, and where you may run into problems
  • That bloatware cleanups are generally personal, tuned to your usage

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Android Studio running on Ubuntu

Install Android Studio On Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver Linux

Objective

Install Android Studio on Ubuntu 18.04

Distributions

Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

Requirements

A working install of Ubuntu 18.04 with root privileges.

Conventions

  • # – requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ – requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Other Versions of this Tutorial

Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa)

Introduction

If you’re serious about developing for Andorid, or you just want to play around and see what app development is all about, Android Studio is the best option out there. It’s the official IDE developed by Google for writing Android apps.

Google developed Android Studio for Ubuntu. Up until recently, Google did all of their development on Ubuntu. They just switched over to Debian, in case you were wondering. Either way, it’s similar, so coding for Android on Ubuntu is a good idea.

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