An ISO file is an image file of a CD/DVD or other disc. It contains all the files from the disc, neatly packed into a single .iso file. This allows users to burn new copies of the disc, or they can open the ISO file to browse and copy its contents to their system.

An ISO file can also be mounted, which is the virtual equivalent to inserting a disc into your PC. The operating system will treat the ISO as a physical CD rom. In this guide, we'll see how to open and mount an ISO file on a Linux system. This can be done from both command line and GUI, so we'll be covering the steps for both methods.

Since the instructions will vary depending on what desktop environment you're using, we'll be covering the steps for GNOME, KDE, and Xfce. The steps for command line should be the same across any Linux distribution.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to open and mount an ISO file via GNOME GUI
  • How to open and mount an ISO file via KDE GUI
  • How to open and mount an ISO file via Xfce GUI
  • How to open and mount an ISO file via command line
Mounting and accessing an ISO file in Linux
Mounting and accessing an ISO file in Linux

Normal user accounts on Linux have their own home directory. This is the location where all of the user account's personal files typically reside, including their recent downloads, desktop contents, etc.

By default, a user's home directory is usually located at /home/username where "username" is the name of the user account. However, you can actually place a user's home directory just about anywhere you'd like. Linux gives us the option to choose a location for the home directory whenever we are creating a new user.

In this guide, we'll go over the commands needed to specify a custom home directory when creating a new user on Linux.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to create a user with a custom home directory
Adding a new user with custom home directory on Linux
Adding a new user with custom home directory on Linux

Sysctl is a utility installed by default in all modern Linux distributions. It is used both to read and write the value of kernel parameters at runtime; the available parameters are those listed under the /proc pseudo-filesystem, and specifically under the /proc/sys directory. In this article we learn how to use this utility, how to make changes persist a reboot, and how to load settings from a file “manually”.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to read the value of kernel parameters
  • How to modify the value of kernel parameters at runtime
  • How to make changes persist a reboot
  • How to load settings from a file manually

The diff utility is, in the vast majority of cases, installed by default in every Linux distribution out there. The program is used to calculate and display the differences between the contents of two files. It is mainly used when working with source code two compare the same versions of two files and highlight the differences between them. In this article we will learn the various modes in which diff can work and how to create a diff file which can later be applied as a patch with the patch utility.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to use diff
  • How to display the output of diff on two columns when using diff in normal mode
  • How to read the diff output in normal, context and unified mode
  • How to create a diff file and apply it as a patch with the patch utility

Libvirt is a free and open source software which provides API to manage various aspects of virtual machines. On Linux it is commonly used in conjunction with KVM and Qemu. Among other things, libvirt is used to create and manage virtual networks. The default network created when libvirt is used is called “default” and uses NAT (Network Address Translation) and packet forwarding to connect the emulated systems with the “outside” world (both the host system and the internet). In this tutorial we will see how to create a different setup using Bridged networking.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to create a virtual bridge
  • How to add a physical interface to a bridge
  • How to make the bridge configuration persistent
  • How to modify firmware rules to allow traffic to the virtual machine
  • How to create a new virtual network and use it in a virtual machine
How to use bridged networking with libvirt and KVM
How to use bridged networking with libvirt and KVM

As a long term user of Microsoft Windows, Fedora, Ubuntu and Linux Mint, I have seen some of the more intricate tantrums a Windows or Linux operating system can throw. My first Mint 20 installation was in early April 2020, even before Mint 20 was released. I have had the unique opportunity to compare it with Microsoft Windows and Ubuntu 20 for day-to-day work and use, and have made some interesting discoveries. Read on to find out.

In this article you will learn:

  • How Linux Mint 20 stacks up to Ubuntu 20 from a practical perspective
  • Which desktop environments are available, and which one I recommend
  • How Linux Mint 20 compares with Microsoft Windows
  • How to install another file manager in Linux Mint 20

Deleting a directory (also called folder) on Linux is a common task that every user will have to perform at some time or another. This can be done via any desktop environment that you have installed, or from command line with the rm command.

While this is a pretty basic function, there are some important caveats to keep in mind. In this guide, we'll go over several examples of deleting a directory on Linux. Feel free to follow along on your own system in order to master the rm command and GUI process.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to delete a directory via GUI
  • How to delete a directory via command line
How to delete a directory on Linux
How to delete a directory on Linux

The time command is a very simple, but useful command line utility in Linux. Essentially, you can think of it as a stopwatch built into the terminal, as it measures the amount of time it takes to execute a specified Linux command.

In this guide, we'll show you how to use the time command through various examples, and teach you how to interpret its output. We'll also show how to use GNU time, which is different than the time utility built into the Bash and zsh shells.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to use time command
  • How to use GNU time
  • How to interpret the output of the time and GNU time commands
time command on Linux
time command on Linux

If you've forgotten some information about your CPU, there's no need to dig out the box or open the case to figure out the make, model, and other information about it. Information about your CPU is stored in Linux, at the operating system level. This means it's perfectly accessible for normal users, we just have to know where to look.

In this guide, we'll see how to obtain CPU information on Linux, from both command line and GUI. On a related note, check out our guide on how to check and monitor CPU utilization if you want to measure the performance of your CPU.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to obtain CPU information from command line and GUI
Obtaining CPU information on Linux
Obtaining CPU information on Linux

When it comes to tidying up your hard drive on Linux, either to free up space or to become more organized, it's helpful to identify which folders are consuming the most storage space.

In this guide, we'll show you how to check disk usage by folder on Linux, through both command line and GUI methods.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to check disk usage with du command examples
  • How to check disk usage with Disk Usage Analyzer GUI utility
Checking disk usage by folder on Linux
Checking disk usage by folder on Linux

Changing directories in a terminal may have become a thing of the past for mainstream users. However, if you do any level of system administration work, testing work, Big Data Manipulation or similar, you will soon find yourself using the Change Directory (cd) command at the Bash or Linux terminal prompt more and more.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • Simple terminal Change Directory (cd) command usage
  • Additional methods, tips and tricks for making a richer cd experience
  • Examples highlighting the use of the various cd commands
Bash Change Directory (cd) Methods, Tips and Tricks
Bash Change Directory (cd) Methods, Tips and Tricks

Although many operating system are available for the Raspberry Pi, the official one is the Raspberry Pi Os. The operating system is made to run for the arm architecture, and can be easily installed on the SD card which will be used as the main Raspberry Pi storage device. Sometimes we may want to perform some tests or try some applications without having a physical Raspberry Pi machine; in this tutorial we will see how we can create a virtual machine with the Raspberry Pi Os system using Qemu and Kvm (Kernel Virtual Machine).

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install qemu and kvm
  • How to download and check the integrity of the latest Raspberry Pi Os version (Buster)
  • How to run the Raspberry Pi Os in a virtual machine

Ethereum has established itself as one of the big players in the cryptocurrency world. It's value has been on a steady rise for well over a year, and it's one of the most widely traded coins in the world.

Ethereum is also an open source technology, and the Ethereum blockchain is powering a whole new wave of web development and web technologies. Even though the initial wave of interest in Ethereum has subsided, it's clearly not too late to get involved.

If you aren't running the AMDGPU-PRO drivers, check out our guide on installing OpenCL for open source AMDGPU before going any further.

Moving a folder (also called directory) on Linux is a common task that every user will have to perform frequently. This can be done via any desktop environment that you have installed, or from command line with the mv command.

While this is a pretty basic function, there are some important caveats to keep in mind. In this guide, we'll go over several examples of moving a folder on Linux. Feel free to follow along on your own system in order to master the mv command and GUI process.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to move a directory via GUI
  • How to move a directory via command line
How to move a folder on Linux
How to move a folder on Linux

Managing user accounts on a Linux system is a fundamental part of administration. Even casual Linux users will run into situations where they need to list user accounts, remove users, and do other basic user management tasks.

In this guide, we'll see how to remove a user from a group on Linux. This can be done either through GUI or command line, and we'll go over the step by step instructions for both methods.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to remove a user account from a group through GUI and command line
Removing a user from a group on Linux
Removing a user from a group on Linux

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