If you need to search for one or more particular files, Linux systems have a few powerful methods for locating them, such as the find and locate commands. Searching for a file with a specific name can be done, but you can also search for files that follow certain naming patterns. This can be broadened all the way to finding files based on file size, file extension, or a lot of other options.

It's also possible to find a particular directory or search for files based on their contents, such as finding all files containing a specific text, but we cover those topics in separate guides.

In this tutorial, you'll learn how to find a file in Linux by using the command line and GUI. Let's get started.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to find a file in Linux via command line
  • How to find a file in Linux via GUI

The ABS or Arch Build System is a package building system native to the Arch Linux distribution: with it, we can easily build packages which can be installed with pacman, the distribution package manager, starting from source code. All we have to do is to specify instruction inside a PKGBUILD file and then build the package using the makepkg tool. In this tutorial we will see how to customize and re-build an already existing package.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • What is the Arch Build System
  • How to download an existing package source files
  • How to modify a PKGBUILD
  • How to build a package using the makepkg utility

You probably already know how to use the grep command to search for a text string in a file on Linux. But what if you want to retrieve a list of files that contain the text string? This is a task best suited for grep or the find command. We'll show you how to do it in this guide.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to use grep and find commands to find all files containing specific text

Jailing an SSH user to their home directory allows you (the administrator) to exercise a lot of control and security over the user accounts on a Linux system.

The jailed user still has access to their home directory, but can't traverse the rest of the system. This keeps everything else on the system private and will prevent anything from being tampered with by an SSH user. It's an ideal setup for a system that has various users and each user's files need to stay private and isolated from the others.

In this guide, we'll show you the step by step instructions for jailing an SSH user to their home directory.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to jail SSH user to home directory

On a Linux system, the need to search one or multiple files for a specific text string can arise quite often. On the command line, the grep command has this function covered very well, but you'll need to know the basics of how to use it. On GUI, most text editors also have the ability to search for a particular string.

In this article, we'll show you how to quickly and easily search through files for a specified text string. You'll learn how to use the grep command to perform this task, as well as how to access the search function in command line and GUI text editors.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to search files for a text string via command line
  • How to search files for a text string via command line text editors
  • How to search a file for a text string via GUI text editors

User management is an important part of Linux administration. Sometimes you need to list the users on a system or disable a user account. Other times, you may need to delete a user account entirely, which is what we'll be covering in this guide.

There are a couple of methods for deleting user accounts on a Linux system. One way to do it is via the command line, and the other method is via GUI, which varies depending on the desktop environment you're running. We'll be covering the command line method as well as removing a user in GNOME and KDE.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to remove a user via command line
  • How to remove a user on GNOME GUI
  • How to remove a user on KDE GUI

systemd is a software suite that's present on many Linux distributions. It's not quite ubiquitous, but it's a staple on the most popular distros, including Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Manjaro and Arch, and more.

What it's best known for is having the ability to control processes running on a system. Using systemd, you can start or stop any service installed on Linux. It's also an easy tool to list information about the services, such as if they are running, if they start automatically at boot up, etc. In this guide, we'll show how to use systemd (specifically the systemctl command) to a see a list of services on Linux.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to list services in systemd with systemctl command

User management is an important part of Linux administration, so it's essential to know about all the user accounts on a Linux system and how to disable user accounts, etc. In this guide, we'll show you how to list the current users via command line and GUI. This will include a GNOME desktop environment as well as KDE.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to list users via command line
  • How to list users on GNOME GUI
  • How to list users on KDE GUI

Have you even been in the situation where you were running a 3 hour copy or script on a remote machine, only to find that it broke at 2h 45min because your network connection or SSH connection dropped momentarily? If so, you know how painful that feels :) Welcome to GNU screen, the utility which allows you to start a separate shell which will not be interrupted if your network connection breaks. Read on to discover how to use it and more!

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install and use the GNU screen utility
  • How to configure the GNU screen utility to function better
  • Basic usage examples on how to use the GNU screen utility from the Bash command line

NGINX is popular web hosting and reverse proxy software for Linux systems. Like many other applications and services, it occasionally needs restarted. Restarting is especially common when making updates to configuration files. You'll always need to restart or reload NGINX for the changes to take effect.

In this article, we'll go over a couple different command line options for restarting and reloading an NGINX server. In addition, you'll learn how to check the NGINX configuration file for mistakes before restarting NGINX. After all, you wouldn't want to load up a configuration that contains errors.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to reload NGINX (no effect on client connections)
  • How to completely restart NGINX

Compressed files with the .zip extension are commonplace throughout Windows systems, as it's been the native file compression method for the operating system since many years ago. On a Linux system, the nearest equivalent would have to be tar files and various methods of compression like gzip.

There are a few reasons why you may need to create or open .zip files on Linux. When sharing files with a Windows user, it'd definitely be better to send them a .zip file than a file with Linux based compression, and you may come across an occasional zip archive online or from a friend that you need to open.

In this guide, we'll show you how to use zip on Linux to open or create compressed .zip archives on both the command line and GUI.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to use zip and unzip via command line
  • How to use zip and unzip via GUI

If you need to find a certain directory on your Linux system, we've got just the guide for you. In this tutorial, we'll be going through the step by step instructions to locate a folder on Linux via both the command line and GUI.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • Find a directory via command line
  • Find a directory via GUI

In this guide, our goal is to learn about the tools and environment provided by a typical GNU/Linux system to be able to start troubleshooting even on an unknown machine. To do so, we will go through two simple example issues: we will solve a desktop and server side problem.



In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to check disk space
  • How to check memory size
  • How to check system load
  • How to find and kill system processes
  • How to user logs to find relevant system troubleshooting information

There are many reasons why you may want to create compressed encrypted file archives. You may want to create an encrypted backup of your personal files. Another possible scenario is that you may want to privately share content with a friend or colleague over the web or through cloud storage. Tar.gz files, or compressed tarballs, are created using the tar command. These tarballs are pretty much the standard go-to format for archives on GNU/Linux, however they are not encrypted. In the above scenarios that we mentioned it is often desirable to have encryption in order to secure your data. This is where gpg comes in.

gpg is a very versatile cryptographic tool which allows you to encrypt files , encrypt e-mail, and verify the integrity of signed files.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • to create compressed archives using tar
  • to create encrypted compressed archives by using tar with gpg in a pipeline
  • to create multiple individual encrypted archives of directories
  • a quick dirty method for copying these archives over a network by adding netcat to the pipeline

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