Oracle Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) are well-known Linux distributions, often used in the business world. Each distro has their own pros and cons, differences, and similarities to the other.

In this guide, we'll be comparing the two distributions across a few key areas and giving a brief review of both distros. Read on to learn more about Oracle Linux and RHEL and how they compare. By the end of this article, you'll be armed with enough information to choose the best distro for your needs.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • Oracle Linux and RHEL background information
  • Oracle Linux and RHEL similarities and differences
  • Which distro should I use, Oracle Linux or RHEL?

Pinging network devices from a Linux system is a really common troubleshooting step for testing your internet connection or the connection to a particular device. If you've spent any time at all tinkering with computers and especially the Linux command line, you're probably a little familiar with the ping command already.

What you may not be so familiar with is IPv6 addresses. IPv6 is intended to replace the IPv4 network address standard - an ongoing process that's been years in the making. And although IPv4 shows no sign of going away right now, IPv6 network addresses are becoming more prevalent.

In this guide, we'll show you how to ping an IPv6 address from a Linux system. This is one of the most fundamental troubleshooting steps, and it's changing a little as the new standard becomes widespread. Various Linux distributions may treat the addresses differently, so let's take a look at how we can ping IPv6 addresses from some of the most popular distros.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to ping an IPv6 address on Linux
How to ping an IPv6 address from Linux
How to ping an IPv6 address from Linux

Pop!_OS and Ubuntu are both popular Linux distributions, each of which has their pros and cons, differences, and similarities to the other.

In this guide, we'll be comparing the two distributions across a few key areas and giving a brief review of both distros. Read on to learn more about Pop!_OS and Ubuntu, and how they compare. By the end of this article, you'll be armed with enough information to choose the best distro for your needs.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • Pop!_OS and Ubuntu background information
  • Pop!_OS and Ubuntu similarities and differences
  • Which distro should I use, Pop!_OS or Ubuntu?

Pop!_OS is based on Ubuntu and belongs to the Debian family of Linux distributions. For other most popular Linux distributions, please visit our dedicated Linux download page.

System76, the developers of POP!_OS, have made some modifications to Ubuntu in order to gear the operating system towards STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and creative professionals. This is a good distro to use for getting lots of work done.

Pop!_OS runs a modified GNOME desktop environment, which has been streamlined to help users manage their workflow. A full list of unique conveniences are compiled on the official website, but include workspaces, keyboard shortcuts, and window stacking. After working with it for a few minutes, you'll find windows and applications very easy to manage and run simultaneously.

Another unique feature of Pop!_OS is that it provides full disk encryption out of the box. New tools are easy to install from the Pop Shop or APT package manager, with some precompiled development toolkits available for fields like deep learning, engineering, media production, and bioinformatics.

IPv6, the newest network address standard for the whole internet, is becoming more widespread and will eventually replace IPv4 entirely. Sooner or later, network admins and computer hobbyists alike will find themselves interacting with IPv6 network addresses.

Simple tasks like using SSH to control a remote system will now change a little, so it's important to relearn a few of the basics. In this guide, we'll show how to SSH to an IPv6 address on a Linux system. These methods will work with all the most popular Linux distributions.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to SSH to an IPv6 address on Linux
How to SSH to an IPv6 address from Linux
How to SSH to an IPv6 address from Linux

How about if you could have a multi-window terminal where, at will, you could press a key and it would be immediately copied to all (or a selection of) windows? How about if you could fit all terminal windows in one big window, without big and bulky borders loosing “precious” screen real estate? These, and more, are basic features of terminator, the handy Linux terminal utility.

Lsblk is a very nice utility installed by default on practically all Linux distributions: we can use it to retrieve a vast range of information about all the block devices attached to the system. In this article we will see how it works and how to use it.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to use the lsblk utility to retrieve information about block devices
  • What is the meaning of the columns displayed in the default utility output
  • How to specify the columns to be displayed and format the output as json or as a list
  • How to display information about a specific device.

Arch Linux is a powerful and customizable operating system with a minimal base install. If you are a newer Linux user then you may be interested in installing Arch Linux, but have been reluctant to do so because of the learning curve that is sometimes associated with the process. If that is the case then it is a great idea to first install Arch Linux as a virtual machine and take it for a test drive. This tutorial will guide you through the steps of installing Arch Linux as a guest machine in VMware Workstation. Following this guide will leave you with a very minimal base Arch install which you can choose to customize however you would like.

If these steps seem like a lot of work just to get a virtual machine up and running, but you want to set up an Arch Linux based virtual machine then you may wan to consider installing Manjaro in VirtualBox instead. If you are not familiar with the relationship between the two distributions then I would recommend that you learn how Arch and Manjaro compare to each other before deciding.

This tutorial assumes that you have a working copy of VMware Workstation installed. If that is not the case then before continuing you you can learn How to install VMware Workstation on Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa Linux or How to install VMware Workstation on Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver Linux.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install Arch Linux in VMware Workstation

Mozilla Firefox, by its very virtue of being a web browser, is a program with a GUI front end. But make no mistake, the program can be launched from the command line, and there are quite a few handy options we can specify with this command.

In this guide, we'll show how to open Firefox from the command line on a Linux system. We'll also go over some tips and tricks so you can get the most out of launching Firefox via terminal.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • Linux commands for Firefox

CUPS is a printing system used on many different Linux distributions. Its use is very widespread, as it has become the standard print manager on the majority of popular Linux distros. It acts as a print spooler, scheduler, print job manager, and can store information for numerous local or network printers.

In this guide, we'll introduce you to CUPS on Linux, with basic information like commands, accessing its web interface, default port, how to add a printer, testing, and starting and stopping the service. Various systems may implement CUPS differently or put their own spin on it, but CUPS works mostly the same on any distro and these instructions will likely apply to any system that utilizes CUPS.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to use the CUPS web interface
  • How to add a printer in CUPS
  • Various CUPS commands
  • How to control the CUPS service
An introduction to CUPS on Linux
An introduction to CUPS on Linux

Apache Solr is open source search software. It's capable of being implemented as an enterprise-level search engine thanks to its high scalability, advanced indexing, fast queries, and ability to integrate with a large variety of applications. It's capable of tackling big data and also has high availability with its load balancing and failover configurations.

The platform is written in Java and can be installed on Linux systems. In this guide, we'll show the step by step instructions for installing Apache Solr on some of the most popular Linux distros, including Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS, and Red Hat.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install Apache Solr on Debian based systems
  • How to install Apache Solr on Red Hat based systems
  • Initial configuration of Apache Solr
Apache Solr installed on Linux
Apache Solr installed on Linux

Oracle Linux is an enterprise level distro based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. You'll find it to be in the same league as most other enterprise focused distributions, such as SUSE Linux. For other most popular Linux distributions please visit our dedicated linux download page.

As you might expect, Oracle Linux has been developed to integrate well with other Oracle products. This makes it a solid choice for businesses that have invested in other Oracle software or hardware, including their popular database applications. It features the "Oracle Unbreakable Kernel" which Oracle touts as highly stable and reliable.

Following in RHEL's footsteps, Oracle Linux comes with the GNOME desktop environment by default. It's free to install and use as you please, but has optional support available for those that wish to subscribe. This is a departure from RHEL's model that makes a subscription necessary to use their OS.

BackupPC is a free and versatile backup suite that can run on Linux systems and supports several protocols like NFS, SSH, SMB, and rsync. It can be used to backup numerous Linux, Mac, and Windows machines.

It has a lot of nice features like automatic backups and a web interface as its control panel. It also uses file compression and hard links to try and minimize the amount of space that your backups consume. Thus if a file is present on multiple machines, BackupPC is smart enough to only store a single copy of that file in the backup.

In this guide, we'll show the step by step instructions for installing BackupPC on popular Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Debian, and CentOS. We'll also cover some initial configuration so you can understand how to setup backup tasks within the program.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install BackupPC on various Linux distros
  • Initial configuration of BackupPC
BackupPC installed on Linux
BackupPC installed on Linux

Hosting a website on a Linux system usually involves multiple software packages that operate together to deliver a web browsing experience to potential viewers. For example, it's common for PHP to dynamically render web content but retrieve data from a database. These are two separate components and they must both be installed to present a website as intended.

XAMPP is a software stack that can run on Ubuntu Linux and make your life a little easier when it comes to web hosting. XAMPP stands for cross-platform (X), Apache (A), MariaDB (M), PHP (P), and Perl (P). These are all common components used in web hosting, and combining them into a single installation makes the initial setup less complicated. XAMPP also comes with Bitnami, which allows you to install content managements systems, such as WordPress, as well as other apps on top of your XAMPP installation if you choose.

In this guide, we'll cover the installation of XAMPP on Ubuntu Linux. Follow along with our step by step instructions to get it setup on your own system.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install XAMPP on Ubuntu Linux
  • How to manage your XAMPP installation
Installing XAMPP on Ubuntu Linux
Installing XAMPP on Ubuntu Linux

Grub is a boot loader for many Linux distributions which basically tells your system where it can find installed operating system(s) on one or more hard drives. Your PC needs this information in order to boot into your Linux distro successfully.

When powering on your PC, Grub begins to look for installed operating systems. If it has trouble finding one or if it can't load part of its config, you'll be brought to the Grub Rescue command line interface that allows you to repair the boot loader.

In this guide, we'll show how Grub Rescue works, along with the commands you'll need in order to repair a broken boot loader and get back into your Linux install.

NOTE
If you experience a no such partition error, we have a separate guide for how to fix grub error: no such partition grub rescue
In this tutorial you will learn:
  • What are the Grub files?
  • How to repair Grub
  • What to do if Grub is completely broken
Grub rescue on a Linux system
Grub rescue on a Linux system

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