Objective

Learning how to manage partitions using the GNU parted partition manager on Linux.

Requirements

  • Root permissions

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Partitions management is one of the most essentials and dangerous task to perform when working with operating systems. In this tutorial we will focus on the use of GNU parted and see how we can use it to create, resize and delete partitions from the command line interface. Parted can work both in interactive and non-interactive mode, the latter being particularly useful when we want to automate some operations or when commands must run in an unattended context, perhaps in a script or inside a kickstart file.

Objective

Install and configure QtPass and PassFF password managers.

Distributions

This guide supports Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Arch Linux.

Requirements

A working install of one of the supported distributions with root permissions.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Remembering Passwords is awful. It's not something anyone likes, and with people needing more online accounts than ever, it's becoming entirely unmanageable. Remember, using the same password twice is a BAD IDEA.

Pass is an old school command line tool that's known for top-notch password management. You can always still use that, but QtPass gives you a more convenient GUI on top of Pass, and PassFF lets you use the password database you create directly with Firefox. Installing these tools on just about any distribution is very simple, and the end result will make your online life a lot easier.

Objective

Install Signal on Android and Linux.

Distributions

This guide is geared towards Ubuntu and Debian, but will work on other distributions with modification.

Requirements

A working Linux install with root privileges and an Android phone

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Do you wish there was a more secure option for sending text messages and even making calls from your phone? Wouldn't it be great if that option utilized end-to-end encryption to ensure that your communications were entirely protected? Well, that option exists in the form of Signal.

Signal is an open source app that supports text and calls. It's available for Android and iOS, and it has desktop clients available across platforms. If you're wondering exactly how trustworthy Signal is, it was endorsed by Edward Snowden and the EFF. It's pretty safe to say that it's a good option.

Objective

Install Onionshare in Linux and use it to send files over Tor.

Distributions

This guide targets Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, and Arch Linux.

Requirements

A working install of one of the supported distributions with root privileges.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Sharing files can be a pain. The larger the file is, the more difficulty it inevitably creates. If you want those files kept private, you're in for a real nightmare. Well, not exactly.

Onionshare is a relatively new application that allows you to share files of any size securely and relatively anonymously over the Tor network without the need for a "midde-man" website. It's completely free and open source, and it's actually easy for anyone to use.

Objective

Install and use of traceroute in Linux.

Distributions

This guide supports Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Arch Linux.

Requirements

A working Linux install with a network connection.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Traceroute finds the path network packets take between your computer and a destination. That destination could be a website, server, or another machine on your network. If you can send network packets to it, you can test the path with traceroute. It's a helpful tool for understanding how data flows through a network.

Objective

Install and use the whois command in Linux.

Distributions

This guide covers Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Arch Linux.

Requirements

A working install of any of the supported distributions with root privileges.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Whois is a simple, yet powerful, tool that allows you to see information about a specific domain name or IP address. You can use it to see things like contact information, nameservers, and domain registration information. Whois is an older core Unix utility, so it's available on every distribution.

Objective

Install VeraCrypt and encrypt a drive.

Distributions

This guide will work on nearly any Linux distribution.

Requirements

A working install of one of the supported distributions with root privileges.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

TrueCrypt was known as a gold standard in filesystem encryption. It was known for providing excellent encryption options, including hidden encrypted volumes. That's something the LUKS can't do. TrueCrypt has been abandoned, but it's been forked into VeraCrypt.

VeraCrypt is the successor to TrueCrypt, and it can do everything that its parent could. VeraCrypt is still under active development with the latest encryption standards being supported.

Objective

After reading this tutorial you should be able to understand and take advantage of HTML5 server-sent events.

Requirements

  • No particular requirements needed

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Server-sent events is an HTML5 technology which allows a client to automatically monitor event notifications from a server, and react as needed. This technology is very useful to notify live events, to implement, for example, a live messaging application or a news feed. In this tutorial we will see how to implement this technology using PHP and javascript.

Objective

Create and use puppet environments to test new configuration before updating a live production system.

Operating System and Software Versions

  • Operating System: Any major linux distribution e.g. Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS
  • Software: puppet and puppet-master

Requirements

Privileged access to the puppet master server and the puppet client node.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Most Puppet installations begin life as a master server running a single branch. The master contains all the manifests and other configuration for all the Puppet agents that are synced to it. This is a fine place to begin but there will rapidly arrive a time when an update needs pushing that has the potential to break a production server. Hoping for the best is not the best way to proceed.

Puppet provides the tools to separate entire branches of configuration. These are called environments. A Puppet environment is a way to supply an isolated group of agent nodes with their own dedicated configuration. Each environment contains an entire Puppet configuration tree and can be considered as a separate Puppet master server.

Objective

UFW basics including UFW installation and setting up a basic firewall.

Distributions

Debian and Ubuntu

Requirements

A working Debian or Ubuntu install with root privileges

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Setting up a firewall can be a huge pain. Iptables isn't exactly known for its friendly syntax, and management isn't much better. Fortunately, UFW makes the process a lot more bearable with simplified syntax and easy management tools.

UFW lets you write your firewall rules more like plain sentences or traditional commands. It lets you manage your firewall like any other service. It even saves you from remembering common port numbers.

Objective

Install and configure a headless Deluge server, and connect to it with the Deluge client.

Distributions

This guide is tailored towards Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Arch Linux.

Requirements

A working install of one of the supported distributions with root privileges.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

There are tons of ways to manage torrents on Linux. Many of the available clients are excellent, but some have distinct advantages. If you're looking to manage large numbers of torrents and manage them over your network, Deluge is easily the best option.

Deluge relies on a client-server model. The Deluge daemon runs on a designated server machine that handles the download and upload of files. Then, you can connect to your server using the Deluge client on any computer on the same network to add, remove, and manage your torrents.

It doesn't hurt that it's very simple to control your torrents with Deluge either. It lets you easily add torrents from a variety of sources and even control their priority and place in the download queue.

Objective

Use GeekBench, Sysbench, Hardinfo, and Phoronix Test Suite to benchmark your Linux system.

Distributions

This will work on most modern distributions.

Requirements

A working Linux install with root privileges.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

There are a bunch of reasons that you'd want to benchmark your Linux system. Most people benchmark out of pure curiosity or to measure the system's performance for games. Benchmarking can also help you identify problems with your system, though, and improve weak points for a smoother and more efficient experience. Benchmarking also helps you identify possible software issues and problematic upgrades with regressions.

There are a number of great ways to benchmark your Linux system. This guide will cover a few of the most common ones. Using any number of these will give you a good perspective of what your system can do, and where its possible weak points are.

Objective

Install Phoronix Test Suite and benchmark your system's graphical performance using the Unigine benchmarks and Steam games.

Distributions

This guide targets Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Arch Linux.

Requirements

A working install of one of the supported distributions with root privileges and the latest graphics drivers installed.

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given linux command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Choosing a Linux distribution can be one of the most difficult things for a Linux user. There are so many excellent options, and they all have their own unique strong suits.

There are also constant updates, news, and general community chatter that muddy the waters even more, making the process much less of a direct route. However, there are a couple of questions that you can ask yourself in choosing a distribution that help clear things up. It's also important to remember that there usually isn't a wrong answer. Every distribution is good. Sure, running Arch on your enterprise scale production deployment probably isn't the best idea, but it's still technically possible. It's all about picking a distribution that fits around that sweet spot of what you want and need.

Objective

Learning how to share you desktop using the vnc protocol and the x11vnc application

Requirements

  • Having the x11vnc package installed

Conventions

  • # - requires given command to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - given command to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

While ssh is a vital tool for every system administrator, being it the most used and secure protocol for remote administration, even capable to grant access to the X11 display server, via X11 forwarding, it is not the right tool to use when the desired target is to share an entire desktop session. In that case the vnc protocol is our friend. By using it, we can completely control another machine, sharing even keyboard or mouse events.

FIND LATEST LINUX JOBS on LinuxCareers.com
Submit your RESUME, create a JOB ALERT or subscribe to RSS feed.
LINUX CAREER NEWSLETTER
Subscribe to NEWSLETTER and receive latest news, jobs, career advice and tutorials.
DO YOU NEED ADDITIONAL HELP?
Get extra help by visiting our LINUX FORUM or simply use comments below.

You may also be interested in: