Best firewall for Linux

Best firewall for Linux

A firewall is a line of defense on your network, primarily used to filter incoming traffic, but also used for outbound rules and other network related security. All major Linux distros come with a software firewall built into them, since it is part of the Linux kernel itself. Any user can configure their system firewall to get started with securing network traffic, but there are many alternatives to the default which will extend or simplify the functionality.

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How to create desktop shortcuts in Linux

Desktop shortcuts creation in Linux

Many people find it useful to organize some of their most frequented applications as shortcuts on their desktop. This allows for quick launching of programs or custom shortcuts. Although most Linux systems rely on a sidebar app launcher or start menu, desktop shortcut launchers can allow you to open applications or websites super fast, since they live right on your desktop and make the targets only a click away.

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Using the mv, rename, and mmv commands to rename files between uppercase and lowercase on Linux

Rename all file names from uppercase to lowercase characters

As a Linux user, you’re likely already familiar with using the mv command to rename a file on a Linux system. The task becomes a little more difficult when you need to rename multiple files at the same time on Linux.

One of the most common batch renaming jobs that are performed is to change all file names to lowercase letters. There are several different ways to do this on Linux. One way is with the native mv utility and a bit of Bash scripting, and the other methods involve the rename and mmv tools, which may or may not already be installed on your Linux distro by default.

In this guide, we’ll go over various command line examples to rename all files from uppercase to lowercase letters on Linux. Some commands will work only for files, some for directories, and some commands work recursively. Take a look at all the different examples below to decide which command(s) to use that would best suit your needs.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to rename all files from uppercase to lowercase using mv, rename, or mmv commands
  • How to install rename and mmv on major Linux distros

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Get CPU temperature on Linux

Get CPU temperature on Linux

The ability to get the temperature of a key component such as a CPU is important, whether you are gaming, overclocking, or hosting intensive processes on a critical server for your company. The Linux kernel comes with modules built in that allow it to access onboard sensors within the CPU. In this tutorial, you will learn how to access these sensors and get the CPU temperature on a Linux system.

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How to set filesystems mount order on modern Linux distributions

In a previous tutorial we discussed about the /etc/fstab file, and how it is used to declare the filesystems which should be mounted on boot. In the pre-Systemd era, filesystem where mounted in the order specified in the /etc/fstab file; on modern Linux distributions, instead, for a faster boot, filesystem are mounted in parallel. Systemd manages the mounting of filesystems via specifically designed units automatically generated from /etc/fstab entries. For these reasons a different strategy must be adopted to establish the dependency between two filesystems, and therefore to set their correct mount order.

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Extend LEDE/OpenWRT system storage with USB

How to Extend LEDE/OpenWRT System Storage with an USB Device

LEDE/OpenWRT is a Linux-based operating system which can be used as an alternative to proprietary firmwares on a wide range of routers.

Installing it provides increased security, let us tweak our router and give us a wide range of software packages to install from the system repositories.

Installing packages is
very easy, thanks to the opkg package manager, but often the available
space on common routers is quite limited. In this tutorial we will see how to
extend the available system space using an USB device.

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How to create snapshots of QEMU/KVM guests

KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) is the virtualization solution (type 1 hypervisor) included in the Linux kernel, which, by default, is used together with QEMU, the userspace software which actually performs the guest systems emulation (type 2 hypervisor). In a previous tutorial we saw how to create and manage KVM virtual machines from the command line; in this article, instead, we will learn how to create and manage guest systems snapshots using tools like virsh and virt-manager.

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