Managing kernel modules on Linux

Basic Linux Kernel commands for module administration

The kernel of a Linux system is the core that everything else in the operating system relies on. The functionality of the kernel can be extended by adding modules to it by use of a specific Linux kernel commands. As such, a user can fine tune their kernel settings by enabling or disabling modules. This level of granular control is one of the many reasons why users love Linux in the first place.

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How to enable and disable SSH for user on Linux

How to enable and disable SSH for user on Linux

After installing SSH on your Linux system, one of the most important security practices it to make sure that the service is only enabled for intended accounts. If you have one or more accounts which do not need SSH access, then the service should be disabled for those accounts. This is to prevent one being exploited, or maybe you just do not want that particular user to be using SSH to access the server.

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Linux command line presentation

Linux command line presentation

There is no need to install tons of software in order to create a nice and informative presentation. tpp, which stands for Text Presentation Program is a simple to use command line presentation tool which allows you to create a fancy text based slide show presentation and share it with your colleagues or students as an ordinary ASCII text file. tpp utilizes ncurses, and it supports colors, slide-in, source code output, animated command line execution and a real time command executions all available from within your terminal.

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How to obtain MAC address in Linux

How to obtain MAC address in Linux

Every network interface, on any device, has its own MAC address. Unlike IP addresses, which can change frequently and easily, MAC addresses are permanently tied to the hardware. Although you can spoof your MAC address with software, the real MAC address of your network interface will never change.

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How to restore hibernation on Fedora

Hibernation, also known as “suspend to disk”, is the most efficient power saving mode in terms of energy consumption. On hibernation, the state of the random access memory is stored on disk, and the machine is completely power down. Although efficient, hibernation is commonly not recommended if using a solid state drive, because each time the system enters this power state, a lot of data must be written to disk, which as we know, has a limited number of write cycles. For this and other reasons, as the the low number of machines on which hibernation works reliably on Linux, Fedora decided to disable this power state by default.

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