Developing and running an Android app on a Linux system

Get Started with Android application development using Linux and Android SDK

Developers interested in the Android mobile operating system are able to use the Android SDK and various IDE software to code applications. These apps can then be made available and marketed to Android users around the world.

There are a lot of choices when it comes to programming Android applications. Your coding environment can involve a Linux system and a variety of different IDE programs to facilitate all of the software development. The trouble here is that each Linux distribution will often have a different set of requirements to run the sofware, and a separate list of steps that need to be followed.

In this guide, we’ll go through the step by step instructions to install Android Studio – which is one of the most popular Android IDEs – on a Linux system. This will work on any distribution because we’ll be using Snap package manager to manage the installation. Love it or hate it, the Snap package manager gets your system ready for Android development very quickly, by handling all the dependencies and working identically on any distribution you’re running, whether it be Ubuntu, Debian, Red Hat, CentOS, AlmaLinux, openSUSE, or any other type of Linux system.

Follow along with us below as we setup Snap package manager, install Android Studio, and then program a Hello World Android application to verify that everything is working properly.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to setup Snap package manager
  • How to install Android Studio and SDK packages
  • How to create a Hello World test application
  • How to run an Android application on an emulated device

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Various examples for removing duplicate lines from a text file on Linux

Removing duplicate lines from a text file using Linux command line

Removing duplicate lines from a text file can be done from the Linux command line. Such a task may be more common and necessary than you think. The most common scenario where this can be helpful is with log files. Oftentimes log files will repeat the same information over and over, which makes the file nearly impossible to sift through, sometimes rendering the logs useless.

In this guide, we’ll show various command line examples that you can use to delete duplicate lines from a text file. Try out some of the commands on your own system, and use whichever one is most convenient for your scenario.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to remove duplicate lines from file when sorting
  • How to count the number of duplicate lines in a file
  • How to remove duplicate lines without sorting the file

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gpg-logo

How to Install Open-Source VSCode Without Telemetry on Linux

Visual Studio Code or VSCode is a text editor developed by Microsoft that supports many popular programming languages such as Go, Java, JavaScript, Node.js, Python, C and C++. It is a directory based, language agnostic source code editor which focuses on directories rather than projects and has many extensions available for it. VSCode’s feature set includes bracket matching, syntax highlighting, code folding, linting, debugging, and built in version control via Git, Subversion or Perforce. Ever since the initial release of VSCode in 2015, it has become an increasingly popular programming tool amongst users of all desktop operating systems including GNU/Linux.

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Various Bash examples for redirecting standard output and standard error to the same file

Bash – Redirect both standard output and standard error to same file

The Bash shell is the most popular shell on Linux systems, and to use the shell efficiently, you need a little knowledge about Bash shell redirections. This is also an essential step in learning Bash scripting.

In this guide, we’ll show how to redirect standard output and standard error to the same file on the Bash shell command line. This will include several examples so you can pick the right method in any scenario.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to redirect standard output and standard error to same file
  • How to redirect standard output and standard error to file and terminal
  • How to redirect standard output and standard error to /dev/null

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Appending text to a file in Bash on Linux

How to append to file on bash shell command line

The Bash shell is the most popular shell on Linux systems, and to use the shell efficiently, you need a little knowledge about Bash shell redirections. This is also an essential step in learning Bash scripting.

In this guide, we’ll show how to append text or command output to a file on the Bash shell command line. This will include several examples so you can pick the right method in any scenario.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to append text or command output to a file
  • How to append and view command output at the same time
  • How to append multiple lines of text to a file
Appending text to a file in Bash on Linux

Appending text to a file in Bash on Linux

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Listing environment variables

How to set and list environment variables on Linux

Environment variables are part of the Linux system shell that contain changing values. They help facilitate scripts and system programs, so that code can accommodate a variety of scenarios. Unlike regular shell variables, environment variables can be accessed system-wide, by any user or process.

Let’s look at a very simple example to see how environment variables work and why they exist. There are many system programs and user made scripts that need to access a current user’s home directory. This can be done reliably through the HOME environment variable. Therefore, a script that contains the following line can be used by any user on the system and it will generate the same result.

$ echo $SHELL > $HOME/current-shell.log

$ cat $HOME/current-shell.log
/bin/bash

In this guide, we’ll show how to list all the environment variables on a Linux system, as well as set new ones. Setting new environment variables can either be done temporarily, or permanently if you need them to survive a reboot. We’ll show instructions for both methods below.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to list environment variables on Linux
  • How to set a temporary environment variable on Linux
  • How to set a permanent environment variable on Linux

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woocommerce-rest-api

How to work with the Woocommerce REST API with Python

WordPress is probably the most used CMS in the world (it is estimated that almost 40% of all websites are built using the platform): it is very easy to install and use, and allows even non-developers to create website in few minutes.
Wordpress has a very large plugin ecosystem; one of the most famous is Woocommerce, which allows us to turn a website into an online store in few steps. The plugin makes use of the WordPress REST API infrastructure; in this tutorial we will see how to interact with the Woocommerce API using the Python programming language, showing how to list, create, update and delete products and categories.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to generate Woocommerce REST API credentials and enable pretty permalinks
  • How to interact with the Woocommerce REST API using Python and the woocommerce package
  • How to get information about the existing Woocommerce categories, create, update and delete them
  • How to get information about the existing Woocommerce products
  • How to create simple and a variable products with variations
  • How to update and delete a product

woocommerce-rest-api

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How to Discover, From Inside a Bash Script, the Path the Script Is In

How to Discover, From Inside a Bash Script, the Path the Script Is In

When you develop complex Bash scripts and start putting various scripts into a folder, where one script interacts with another by, for example, starting it, it quickly becomes necessary to ensure we know the path the script was started from, so we can start the other scripts with a fully qualified pathname. This is important because the first script may have been started from outside the script’s directory. We could have also done so by using a relative path, so even – somehow – reading the command that started the current script will not work.

In this tutorial, you will learn:

  • What the pwd command is, and what it does
  • How to discover from inside a Bash script what path that same script is in

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Computer Math Basics: Binary, Decimal, Hexadecimal, Octal

Computer Math Basics: Binary, Decimal, Hexadecimal, Octal

How we express a number depends on whether we are a computer or a human. If we are human, we are likely to express numbers using our familiar 10-base decimal system. If we are a computer, we are likely, at our core, to express numbers as 2-base or binary.

So what is up with all the many ways of expressing numbers, and why do they exists? This article will go into some detail and hopefully by the end you’ll be counting octal on your fingers. Which works fine by the way, as long as you use only 8 fingers, after all… octal is 8-base.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to do simple counting in up non-decimal systems like binary, hexadecimal and octal.
  • What the terms 2-base, 10-base etc. stand for and how to understand them more easily.
  • The connection between these various methods of expressing numbers

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Special Bash Variables with examples

Special Bash Variables with examples

Bash is a great coding language, which allows you to do complex things like Big Data Manipulation, or simply create sever or desktop management scripts.

The entry level skill required to use the Bash language is quite low, and one-liner scripts (an often used jargon, which indicates multiple commands executed at the command line, forming a mini-script), as well as regular scripts, can grow in complexity (and how well written they are) as the Bash developer learns more.

Learning to use special variables in Bash is one part of this learning curve. Whereas originally the special variables may look cryptic: $$, $?, $*, \$0, $1, etc., once you understand them and use them in your own scripts, things will soon become clearer and easier to remember.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to use special variables in Bash
  • How to correctly quote variables, even special ones
  • Examples using special variables from the command line and scripts

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Introduction to named pipes on Bash shell

Introduction to named pipes on Bash shell

On Linux and Unix-based operating systems, pipes are very useful since they are a simple way to achieve IPC (inter-process communication). When we connect two processes in a pipeline, the output of the first one is used as the input of the second one. To build a so called “anonymous” pipe, all we have to do is to use the | operator. Anonymous, or unnamed pipes last just as long as the processes they connect. There is, however, another type of pipe we can use: a FIFO, or named pipe. In this article we will see how named pipes work and in what they are different from the standard pipes.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • What is a named pipe
  • How to create a named pipe
  • How to recognize a named pipe
  • How named pipes work
  • How to delete a named pipe

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