Installing WINE

Since there are multiple available versions of WINE, there are different ways to install it as well. Of course, each distribution also packages and ships WINE differently, and most only ship one or two versions of it. Thankfully, there are third party repositories available, and, when all else fails, WINE can be compiled from source. Unless you’re running Gentoo, source should probably be the last resort, since it’s obviously harder to maintain, but it can work in cases where you want a custom WINE build that isn’t packaged for your distro.

Ubuntu

Ubuntu is one of the more well supported distributions due to its popularity. With that said, Ubuntu’s repositories are sorely lacking when it comes to up-to-date WINE support. Both stable and development version of WINE in the Ubuntu 16.04 are severely out of date. There are PPAs to help, though.

WineHQ Stable

The version of ‘stable’ in the default repositories is significantly behind, even for stable. The Ubuntu Wine Team maintains a PPA for stable. It’s a bit behind too, but not nearly as far. Before adding the PPA, first make sure that you have x86 support enabled .
$ sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
Once it is, add the PPA and update Apt. Then you can can just install it normally.
$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-wine/ppa
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install wine1.8

WineHQ Development

Like ‘stable,’ the ‘development’ version of WINE in the officially repositories is way behind. The team that develops WINE actually supports Ubuntu directly with their own PPA, so those outdated official packages don’t matter. Since WINE relies heavily on 32bit support, make sure that Apt supports 32bit too.
$ sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
Then, you can add the PPA, update Apt, and install.
$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:wine/wine-builds
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install wine-devel

Staging

Ubuntu doesn’t support ‘staging’ in the official repositories. Again, the WINE developers actually package ‘staging’ in their PPA. As a result, the process for installing ‘staging’ on Ubuntu is nearly identical to ‘development.’ Like ‘development’ enable 32bit.
$ sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
Similarly, add the PPA, update Apt, and install.
$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:wine/wine-builds
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install winehq-staging
If, for some reason, you want ‘staging’ installed in a different directory than WineHQ WINE, install with the the command below.
$ sudo apt-get install wine-staging

Gallium Nine

Gallium Nine faces a similar situation as well. It isn’t officially supported, but there is a PPA available. Unfortunately, there are no packaged versions of Gallium Nine with the ‘staging’ patches as well. This really shouldn’t be an issue, since they do both do a similar job. Once again, enable 32bit.
$ sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
Then, add the PPA, update Apt, and install.
$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:commendsarnex/winedri3
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install wine1.9

Debian

Debian is not as well supported as Ubuntu, but oddly, has better packages in the default repositories. There aren’t really convenient PPAs like Ubuntu, but there are some repositories that make using every version of WINE possible.

WineHQ Stable

Jessie The WINE packages in the main Jessie repositories are out of date. However, in ‘jessie-backports,’ they are up-to-date. So, the first steps in installing ‘stable’ on Jessie are enabling 32bit and adding the ‘jessie-backports’ repository.
#  dpkg --add-architecture i386
# vim /etc/apt/sources.list
Add the line:
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian jessie-backports main
Save the document. Now, you can just update Apt and install WINE, but you have to specify that you are installing from the ‘jessie-backports’ repository.
# apt-get update
# apt-get -t jessie-backports install wine
Sid Of course, Sid is more up to date. It’s not entirely clear why you’d want to run ‘stable’ WINE on unstable Debian, but doing so only requires that you add 32bit support, update, and install the package.
# dpkg --add-architecture i386
# apt-get update
# apt-get install wine

WineHQ Development

Jessie If ‘stable’ wasn’t up-to-date in Debian’s default repositories, it’d be crazy to think that ‘development’ would be. Again, like ‘stable,’ you have to enable 32bit support and the ‘jessie-backports’ repository. The only difference in the process is the name of the package that you need to install.
#  dpkg --add-architecture i386
# vim /etc/apt/sources.list
Add the line:
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian jessie-backports main
Save, update Apt, and install the ‘development’ package from ‘jessie-backports.’
# apt-get update
# apt-get -t jessie-backports install wine-development
Sid Just like with ‘stable,’ Sid makes things easier. It’s as simple as enable 32bit, update, and install.
# dpkg --add-architecture i386
# apt-get update
# apt-get install wine-development

Staging

Jessie Start off by enabling 32bit support.
#  dpkg --add-architecture i386
Then, install the package that allows Apt to use the https protocol.
# apt-get install apt-transport-https
The packages will be coming from a repository maintained by the WINE developers. Before using it, you’ll need to get and add the release key.
$ wget https://repos.wine-staging.com/Release.key
# apt-key add Release.key 
Then, open up /etc/apt/sources.list and add the following line.
deb https://repos.wine-staging.com/debian/ jessie main
Now, you can update Apt and install.
# apt-get update
# apt-get install winehq-staging
If you want ‘staging’ installed alongside regular WINE, install it with the command below.
# apt-get install wine-staging
Sid Thanks to the repositories from the WINE developers, the install process for Sid is almost exactly the same as it is for Jessie. Begin with enabling 32bit support and installing apt-transport-https
#  dpkg --add-architecture i386
# apt-get install apt-transport-https
Then, get the release key and add it to Apt.
$ wget https://repos.wine-staging.com/Release.key
# apt-key add Release.key
Finally, update and install wine.
# apt-get update
# apt-get install winehq-staging
Again, to install it alongside regular WINE, use the following command.
# apt-get install wine-staging

Gallium Nine

Gallium Nine isn’t packaged for Debian. You can compile it from source if you’d like, but there is another option. The Ubuntu packages actually work in Debian, so this guide is going to cover those. They aren’t ideal, but they are actively maintained and much easier to deal with. Jessie and Sid First, add 32bit support.
#  dpkg --add-architecture i386
Then, add the sources to /etc/apt/sources.list.
# vim /etc/apt/sources.list
deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/commendsarnex/winedri3/ubuntu xenial main 
deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/commendsarnex/winedri3/ubuntu xenial main
From there, you can just update and install.
# apt-get update
# apt-get install wine1.9

Fedora

Fedora is kind of strange. Fedora focuses on providing the latest software releases from upstream and doesn’t have a whole lot of third party support. As a result, there is no package for WINE ‘stable’ available for Fedora. However, there is a repository maintained by the WINE developers for ‘development’ and ‘staging,’ and there is a Copr repo for Gallium Nine.

Development and Staging

The easiest way to add the WINE repository that holds both the ‘development’ and ‘staging’ packages is by using DNF’s config-manager.
# dnf config-manager --add-repo https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/fedora/24/winehq.repo
Then, it’s just a matter of installing the right package.
WineHQ Development
# dnf install wine-development64
Staging
# dnf install wine-staging64

Gallium Nine

To install the Copr repository, use the DNF config-manager
# dnf config-manager –add-repo https://copr.fedorainfracloud.org/coprs/dyskette/wine-gallium-nine/repo/fedora-24/dyskette-wine-gallium-nine-fedora-24.repo
Then, you can install the package with DNF.
# dnf install wine

Arch Linux

Arch Linux is another example of a bleeding edge distribution aiming to provide only the latest software. The packages in the official ‘Multilib’ repository are almost always the latest, so for ‘development’ and ‘staging,’ things are super easy. For the rest, the AUR has you covered.

WineHQ Stable

If you want WINE ‘stable’ on Arch, which you probably won’t as an Arch user, you can get it from the AUR. Make sure that your installation is configured with all AUR prerequisites. There are, of course, tools to manage AUR downloads, but this guide will cover the most basic way of installing the package. So, navigate to the package page here. Download and un-tar the package snapshot into the folder that you’d like to build it in. Then, cd into that folder.
$ cd /path/to/wine-stable
Inside that folder, run makepkg to build and install it.
$ makepkg -sri

WineHQ Development

pacman -S wine
Yeah, that’s really it.

Staging

pacman -S wine-staging
Again, it’s super easy.

Gallium Nine

Gallium Nine is also available though the AUR. Make sure that your installation is set up to use the AUR, and go to the package page here. Download and un-tar the package snapshot into the folder that you want to build in. Then, cd into that folder.
$ cd /path/to/wine-gaming-nine
In that folder, run makepkg to build and install.
$ makepkg -sri

Gentoo

Gentoo plays by its own rules. As a result, it actually has the most options, and the most comprehensive support for WINE. Since it’s source-based, every variation of WINE is available in the main repository. Choosing which one you want to use comes down to enabling testing and ‘Use’ flags.

WineHQ Stable

This is the default. If you don’t configure anything, you will get the ‘stable’ version of WINE.
# emerge wine

WineHQ Development

The ‘development’ version of WINE can be accessed by enabling testing packages for WINE. Do do this, add the following line somewhere in /etc/portage/package.accept_keywords.
app-emulation/wine ~amd64
Save the file, and install wine.
# emerge wine

Staging

To build WINE with the ‘staging’ patches, enable the staging ‘Use’ flag.

Gallium Nine

To build WINE with Gallium Nine support, enable the d3d9 ‘Use’ flag.

Table of Contents

  1. About WINE Installation and Configuration Tutorial
  2. Introduction
  3. Installing WINE
  4. Configuring WINE with Winecfg
  5. Using WINE Prefixes
  6. Configuring WINE with Winetricks