The default relational SQL database on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8 Linux has been chnaged from MySQL to MariaDB. MariaDB is a community-developed fork of the MySQL relational database and in-place substitute for MySQL.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to install MariaDB/MySQL server
  • How to start and enable MariaDB to start automatically after reboot
  • How to secure MariaDB database and set root password
  • How to create database for a remote access
  • How to open MySQL/MariaDB firewall ports for incoming traffic
  • How to login to MySQL/MariaDB from a remote host
MariaDB on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 database creation example
MariaDB on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 database creation example

Software Requirements and Conventions Used

Software Requirements and Linux Command Line Conventions
Category Requirements, Conventions or Software Version Used
System RHEL 8 / CentOS 8
Software MariaDB 10.3.10
Other Privileged access to your Linux system as root or via the sudo command.
Conventions # - requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
$ - requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

How to install Mariadb/MySQL server on RHEL 8 Linux step by step instructions


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  1. Perform MariaDB server installation:
    # dnf install mariadb-server
    
  2. Start MariaDB server and enable the database to start after reboot:
    # systemctl start mariadb
    # systemctl enable mariadb
    
  3. Secure MariaDB database with mysql_secure_installation script. This step is optional but highly recommended:
    # mysql_secure_installation 
    
    NOTE: RUNNING ALL PARTS OF THIS SCRIPT IS RECOMMENDED FOR ALL MariaDB
          SERVERS IN PRODUCTION USE!  PLEASE READ EACH STEP CAREFULLY!
    
    In order to log into MariaDB to secure it, we'll need the current
    password for the root user.  If you've just installed MariaDB, and
    you haven't set the root password yet, the password will be blank,
    so you should just press enter here.
    
    Enter current password for root (enter for none): 
    OK, successfully used password, moving on...
    
    Setting the root password ensures that nobody can log into the MariaDB
    root user without the proper authorisation.
    
    Set root password? [Y/n] Y
    New password: 
    Re-enter new password: 
    Password updated successfully!
    Reloading privilege tables..
     ... Success!
    
    
    By default, a MariaDB installation has an anonymous user, allowing anyone
    to log into MariaDB without having to have a user account created for
    them.  This is intended only for testing, and to make the installation
    go a bit smoother.  You should remove them before moving into a
    production environment.
    
    Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] Y
     ... Success!
    
    Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from 'localhost'.  This
    ensures that someone cannot guess at the root password from the network.
    
    Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] Y
     ... Success!
    
    By default, MariaDB comes with a database named 'test' that anyone can
    access.  This is also intended only for testing, and should be removed
    before moving into a production environment.
    
    Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] Y
     - Dropping test database...
     ... Success!
     - Removing privileges on test database...
     ... Success!
    
    Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes made so far
    will take effect immediately.
    
    Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] Y
     ... Success!
    
    Cleaning up...
    
    All done!  If you've completed all of the above steps, your MariaDB
    installation should now be secure.
    
    Thanks for using MariaDB!
    


  4. Create a sample database. In the following example we will use the following parameters:
    DDATABE NAME = linuxconfig
    USER NAME = lubos
    REMOTE IP ADDRESS = 192.168.1.2
    PASSWORD = linuxconfig.org
    PERMISSIONS = GRANT ALL
    
    Start by login into the MariaDB database as root user using the previously created root password.

    In case you did not secure your MariaDB database with password simply omit the -p option with the mysql command:

    # mysql -u root -p
    Enter password: 
    Welcome to the MariaDB monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
    Your MariaDB connection id is 17
    Server version: 10.3.10-MariaDB MariaDB Server
    
    Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.
    
    Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.
    
    MariaDB [(none)]> CREATE DATABASE linuxconfig;
    Query OK, 1 row affected (0.001 sec)
    
    MariaDB [(none)]> CREATE USER 'lubos'@'192.168.1.2' IDENTIFIED BY 'linuxconfig.org';
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.001 sec)
    
    MariaDB [(none)]> GRANT ALL ON linuxconfig.* TO 'lubos'@'192.168.1.2';
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.001 sec)
    
    MariaDB [(none)]> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.001 sec)
    
    MariaDB [(none)]> quit
    Bye


  5. Open up the firewall port for incoming MySQL/MariaDB connections:
    # firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=mysql
    success
    # firewall-cmd --reload
    success
    
  6. Login to MariaDB database from the remote host eg. 192.168.1.2 to RHEL 8 / CentOS 8 MariadDB server using preset hostname like for example in this case rhel8-mariadb or by specifying the server's IP address:
    $ mysql -h rhel8-mariadb -u lubos -p
    Enter password: 
    Welcome to the MariaDB monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
    Your MariaDB connection id is 18
    Server version: 10.3.10-MariaDB MariaDB Server
    
    Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.
    
    Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.
    
    MariaDB [(none)]> Bye
    
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