The NVIDIA Driver is a program needed for your NVIDIA Graphics GPU to function with better performance. It communicates between your Linux operating system, in this case Fedora 31, and your hardware, the NVIDIA Graphics GPU. The NVIDIA drivers can be installed by using the bash command after stopping the GUI and disabling the nouveau driver by modifying the GRUB boot menu.

To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

The kernel is the most important component of an operating system: among the other things, it provides support for different types of hardware and manages resource allocations.

Linux is a monolithic kernel: although its functionalities can be included statically or built and loaded as separate modules, it always runs as a "single piece" in the same address space. In this tutorial we will see how to download, compile and install a vanilla Linux kernel.

The instructions provided should work on all Linux distributions, however this guide is focused on compiling the kernel on a Fedora system.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to configure, compile and install a vanilla Linux kernel
  • How to package the compiled kernel and its modules
linux-kernel-ncurses-config-interface
The ncurses-based configuration menu for the Linux kernel

The Nvidia CUDA toolkit is an extension of GPU parallel computing platform and programming model. The Nvidia CUDA installation consists of inclusion of the official Nvidia CUDA repository followed by the installation of relevant meta package.

In this How to install NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit on Fedora 29 Linux tutorial you will learn:
  • How to download the latest NVIDIA CUDA repository package.
  • How to install the CUDA repository package on Fedora 29.
  • How to select and install a CUDA meta package on Fedora 29.
  • How to export system path to the Nvidia CUDA binary executables.
  • How to confirm and test your CUDA installation.

The NVIDIA Driver is a program needed for your NVIDIA Graphics GPU to function with better performance. It communicates between your Linux operating system, in this case Fedora 29 Linux, and your hardware, the NVIDIA Graphics GPU.

In this article you will learn how to install NVIDIA Drivers on Fedora 29 Linux. We will start by disabling the default nouveau opensource NVIDIA Drivers and then provide step by step instructions on how to successfully install the official NVIDIA Driver on Fedora 29.

To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

The following article will guide you through the upgrade process of Fedora 28 workstation to Fedora 29. There are multiple ways on how to perform the Fedora upgrade. This article will explain how to upgrade to Fedora 29 via graphical user interface as well as how to use the dnf command to perform the Fedora upgrade via the Linux command line.

In this article you will learn:
  • How to update the package index repository on Fedora 28 via GUI.
  • How to download Fedora 29 via GUI.
  • How to install Fedora 29 via GUI.
  • How to upgrade Fedora via the Linux command line.

The Nvidia CUDA toolkit is an extension of the GPU parallel computing platform and programming model. The Nvidia CUDA installation consists of inclusion of the official Nvidia CUDA repository followed by the installation of relevant meta package.

In this How to install NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit on Fedora 28 Linux tutorial you will learn:
  • How to download the latest NVIDIA CUDA repository package.
  • How to install the CUDA repository package on Fedora 28.
  • How to select and install a CUDA meta package on Fedora 28.
  • How to export system path to the Nvidia CUDA binary executables.
  • How to confirm and test your CUDA installation.

The NVIDIA Driver is a software necessary for your NVIDIA Graphics GPU to function with better performance. It exchanges information between your Linux operating system, in this case Fedora 28 Linux, and the hardware in question, in this case the NVIDIA Graphics GPU.

In this guide you will learn how to install NVIDIA Drivers on Fedora 28 Linux. First, we will be disabling the default nouveau opensource NVIDIA Drivers and then install the official NVIDIA Driver by using the Linux terminal command.

To install Nvidia driver on other Linux distributions, follow our Nvidia Linux Driver guide.

Introduction

With the use of modern Gnu/Linux distributions package managers, package dependencies are no more a problem per-se, but usually each distribution ships with a certain version of a program, and we want to install a new version we have to compile it, or rely on third party repositories. The same thing happens if the repositories of our favorite distribution doesn't contain a certain application we need. Also for an application distributor can be time-consuming having to provide different package formats for the same application.

Flatpak is a relatively new technology which aims at solving those kind of problems. Applications installed with Flatpack come pre-packaged with all their dependencies and run in their own sandboxed environment. In this tutorial we will see how to install and use flatpak on Fedora 28.

Objective

Install MakeMKV on Fedora Linux

Distributions

This is tested with Fedora 25 but may work with earlier or later versions of Fedora.

Requirements

An working install of Fedora with root privileges.

Difficulty

Easy

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Objective

Install the official Spotify Linux client on Fedora.

Distributions

This was tested with Fedora 25, but it may work with slightly newer or older versions of Fedora.

Requirements

A working install of Fedora with root access.

Difficulty

Easy

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Two of the most popular and highest quality media programs available for Linux are not available through Fedora's default repositories. Of course, these are no other than Kodi and VLC, and they are available on Fedora through RPM Fusion.

Kodi, which was previously known as XBMC, has boomed in popularity as of late with both Linux and mainstream audiences.

VLC has been a long time favorite for anyone looking for a media player capable of playing content with just about any encoding or file extension.

Getting the Repositories

As with many multimedia things in Fedora, this is an instance of "RPM Fusion to the rescue." Utilizing the reliable and trusted RPM Fusion repository grants access to both Kodi and VLC as well as valuable multimedia codecs and libraries required to play many people's favorite content.

The best way to get the repositories is to use the series of commands provided by RPM Fusion.
$ su -c 'dnf install https://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-$(rpm -E %fedora).noarch.rpm https://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-$(rpm -E %fedora).noarch.rpm'

Introduction

Google Chrome is one of the fastest and most well liked browsers available. Despite its closed source, it has long been a favorite of Linux users. This is especially true because it integrates features traditionally locked behind other proprietary software, like Flash, which traditionally function poorly.

Distributions like Fedora which only ship free software don't include Chrome, but Google provides convenient repositories to major Linux distributions to make installing and managing Chrome on Linux easy.

Introduction

Steam is easily the most popular PC gaming client, and with hundreds of titles available for Linux, it's not wonder why Linux gamers would want to install and use it. This is easier on some distributions than others, especially considering that Valve, the company behind Steam, officially targets Ubuntu and Debian.

Fedora users won't find Steam anywhere in the official Fedora repositories. This is mostly because of Fedora's strict free software policies. It is available through a reliable third-party repository, though, and it runs great when you get it set up.

Before You Install

Steam for Linux is 32bit only. That may feel like a hassle, but it really isn't. The only thing that you have to make sure of is that the 32bit version of your graphics driver is installed on your system.

If you are using any of the open source drivers, chances are, 32bit support is already installed and working. If you want to reinstall to be sure run whichever of the following fits your graphics card.

Intel

$ su -c 'dnf -y install xorg-x11-drv-intel mesa-libGL.i686 mesa-dri-drivers.i686'

Fedora 24 brings with it a number of technical improvements, software upgrades, and under the hood. It’s clear that the Fedora developers have been working closely with upstream sources to tightly integrate advances in everything from the kernel to GNOME, Systemd, NetworkManager, and GCC6 which have all been forged into a powerful core. However, that’s about where it ends.

When it comes to a being a full fledged desktop distribution, Fedora 24 falls a bit short, and that’s mostly due to the Fedora project’s limited repositories.

The default Fedora 24 desktop

Introduction

This article at is the logical continuation of our PXE article, because after reading this you will be able to network boot AND actually install the distribution of your choice. But there are other uses of creating your own repository. For example, bandwidth. If you manage a network and all the systems (or some) are running the same distribution, it's easier for you to just rsync in conjunction with a nearby mirror and serve updates yourself. Next, maybe you have some packages created by you that your distro won't accept in the main tree, but the users find them useful. Get a domain name, set up a webserver and there you go. We will not detail the setup of a webserver here, just basic installation tasks and the basic setup of a repository for Fedora or Debian systems. Hence you are expected to have the necessary hardware (the server and the necessary network equipment, depending on the situation) and some knowledge about Linux and webservers. So, let's start.

NOTE:This article was moved from our previous domain linuxcareer.com.

Creating a repository on Fedora systems

Installing the tools

Fedora has a tool called createrepo which simplifies the task at hand. So, all we need to install is that and httpd as the webserver:

 # yum install createrepo httpd 

Setting up the repositories

Now, after setting up your webserver, we will assume that the root directory is ar /var/www. We have to create the necessary directories in an organized matter (feel free to adjust to taste if necessary or just follow the official layout):

 
 # cd /var/www/html
 # mkdir -p fedora/15/x86_64/base
 # mkdir fedora/15/x86_64/updates

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