One of the most attractive features of running a Linux system is the instant access to thousands of packages that are able to be installed from the Linux distro's package manager.

Installing packages is really easy. That is, as long as you know the name of what you're trying to install. If you don't, then you can always search for installable packages. On distros that use the apt package manager, like Debian, Ubuntu, and Linux Mint just to name a few, this is done with the apt search command.

In this guide, we'll show you how to use the apt search command with multiple examples. You'll quickly learn to master the task of finding packages to install.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to search for packages with apt

The hostname of a Linux system is important because it's used to identify the device on a network. The hostname is also shown in other prominent places, such as in the terminal prompt. This gives you a constant reminder of which system you're working with. It's a real life saver when you're managing multiple systems through SSH and those command line terminals start to blend together in your mind.

Of course, IP addresses are used when devices need to communicate with each other, but those can change frequently. Hostnames give us a way to know which device we're interacting with either on the network or physically, without remembering a bunch of numbers that are subject to change. Thus, it's important that your system bears a hostname which helps you to identify it quickly. For example, "backup-server" is much more informative than "server2." If you can't easily identify a system's purpose from the hostname, it's time to change it.

In this guide, we'll show you how to change the hostname on Debian Linux. Changing the hostname can be done either by command line or GUI, and we'll show you the steps for both methods below.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to change the Debian hostname from command line
  • How to change the Debian hostname from GNOME GUI
Changing the hostname on Debian Linux
Changing the hostname on Debian Linux

LUKS (Linux Unified Key Setup) is the de-facto standard encryption method used on Linux-based systems. While the Debian installer is perfectly capable of creating a LUKS container, it lacks the ability to recognize and therefore re-use an already existing one. In this article we see how we can workaround this problem using the “DVD1” installer, and running it in “advanced” mode.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install Debian in “advanced-mode”
  • How to load the installer additional modules needed to unlock an existing LUKS device
  • How to perform the installation on an existing LUKS container
  • How to add an entry in the crypttab file of the newly installed system and regenerate its initramfs

Vsftpd is the acronym of Very Secure FTP Daemon: it is one of the most used ftp servers on Linux and other Unix-like operating systems. It is open source and released under the GPL license, and supports virtual users and SSL for data encryption. In this tutorial we will see how to install it and configure it on Linux.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to install vsftpd on Debian 10
  • How to configure vsftpd
  • How to setup anonymous usage
  • How to setup login with local users
  • How to setup virtual users
  • How to setup ufw to allow incoming traffic

If you've ever used Debian Linux or one of the many Linux distributions that were derived from it, such as Ubuntu, you may have seen the apt and apt-get commands sprinkled throughout the distro's documentation.

At surface level, these commands seem interchangeable, and a lot of documentation or online guides throw them around as if they are. However, there are some key differences between the two and we have some recommendations about which one you should be using. In this guide, we'll explain the differences and give some examples for both commands. Read on to learn about the specific uses for each command and which one is better for you to use.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • What distros use apt and apt-get?
  • What is the difference between apt and apt-get?
  • Command examples for apt and apt-get

Debian is one of the oldest Linux distributions that still survives today. If you're looking for a tried and true Linux distro to download, Debian is about as good as it gets. For other most popular Linux distributions please visit our dedicated linux download page. Debian believes in a completely free operating system.

Other popular Linux distributions, like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and many others are based off of Debian. It comes with GNOME desktop environment and a huge repository of software that can be installed with apt package manager.

Debian is a solid choice for both desktops and servers, which has given way to its sustained popularity over the last three decades. Debian's long reign as one of the most popular distributions has yielded a lot of documentation available on the official website. It's easy to get started with Debian.

The upgrade from Raspbian Stretch to Raspbian 10 Buster is a relatively simple procedure. However, exercise caution, as there is always a chance to break the entire system. The fewer installed 3rd-party packages and services, the more likely you are able successfully to upgrade your Raspbian Linux system.

What's New

  • UEFI Secure Boot
  • AppArmor enabled per default
  • Optional hardening of APT
  • Unattended-upgrades for stable point releases
  • Substantially improved man pages for German speaking users
  • Network filtering based on nftables framework by default
  • Cryptsetup defaults to on-disk LUKS2 format
  • driverless printing with CUPS 2.2.10
  • Basic support for Allwinner A64 based devices

This article describes a simple way to create a home made debian package and include it into a local package repository. Although we could use an existing Debian/Ubuntu package, we will start from scratch by creating and packaging our own trivial application. Once our package is ready, we will include it into our local package repository. This article illustrates a very simplistic approach, however it may serve as a template in many different scenarios.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to create a trivial debian package
  • How to create a local debian repository
  • How to add the repository to the list of software sources

If you already have a Nextcloud server in place, you're going to need to set up your client devices to connect to it. Setting up the Nextcloud client on Debian is very simple, and so is setting up your folders to sync.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to Install the Nextcloud Client
  • How to Connect to the Server
  • How to Set up a Folder to Sync

LEMP is an excellent alternative to traditional LAMP servers. Nginx is lighter weight and faster than Apache in some situations. It can also be configured to do other useful things, like serve as a reverse proxy. Just like with LAMP, Debian is an excellent platform for LEMP servers. Everything you need is available in the Debian repositories, so it's simple to get started.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to Set Up MariaDB
  • How to Install PHP
  • How to Install Nginx
  • How to Configure Nginx
  • How to Test Your Server

Not all Debian systems have a GUI, and even though using WiFi on a server isn't common, there are plenty of instances where you're using WiFi with a headless setup, like on a Raspberry Pi. It's not difficult to connect using only the tools provided out of the box in Debian.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to Scan for a Network
  • How to Generate a WPA_Supplicant Config
  • How to Set up a WPA_Supplicant Config File
  • How to Connect to Your WiFi

Whether you're setting up Nextcloud on a home server or making it accessible online through a VPS, Debian makes an excellent platform. You can even host it on a Raspberry Pi. This guide will get you started with a basic setup.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to Install the Required Packages
  • How to Set Up Your Database
  • How to Download Nextcloud
  • How to Install Nextcloud

UFW is very simple to use and configure. It's available right in the Debian repositories, and it integrates well into a Debian system. The simplified controls and ability to easily start and stop your firewall make in an excellent option for desktops and small servers.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to Install UFW
  • How to Set the Defaults on UFW
  • How to Allow Ports
  • How to Allow Interfaces
  • How to Allow Protocol
  • How to Allow IP Addresses
  • How to Enable UFW

If you plan on doing any sort of Ruby development, RVM is a must. Even though Debian does have its own Ruby packages, they're bound to Debian's release schedules, making them an inflexible option for your projects. RVM is simple to get set up, and it allows a much greater decree of flexibility, no matter what sort of projects you're working on.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to Install cURL
  • How to Import the RVM GPG Key
  • How to Run The RVM Install
  • How to Install Ruby

There are two very simple ways to create a Python virtual environment on Debian 10. They're very similar and offer nearly the same benefits. As an added bonus, you won't need to install anything outside of the default Debian repositories to use them.

In this tutorial you will learn:
  • How to Install the Dependencies
  • How to Use Python 3's Venv
  • How to Use Virtualenv

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