Objective

This article explains a system upgrade procedure from Debian 9 Stretch to Debian 10 Buster.

Currently, Debian Buster is in a state of testing. The stable Debian 10 Buster release date is to be expected in a second or third quarter of 2019.

Buster Full Upgrade

Let's first fully upgrade our current Debian Stretch system:
# apt-get update
# apt-get upgrade
# apt-get dist-upgrade

Update Package Repository to Debian Buster

# sed -i 's/stretch/buster/g' /etc/apt/sources.list

Introduction

The Cloud can be a great thing. It can also be a terrifying Orwellian nightmare where some faceless corporate entity has every picture you've ever taken of your family. To prevent the latter, there's Nextcloud.

You many have heard of Owncloud. It was the primary solution for open source self hosted cloud storage for quite some time. Unfortunately, due to internal struggles, Owncloud split. Owncloud still remains, but it is currently owned by the people that caused the split. Nextcloud, on the other hand, is run by the original founder and the people who wanted to continue to work with the open source community.

Before you start the Nextcloud install process, you should follow our other guide on setting up a LAMP server on Debian Stretch. Nextcloud is a PHP application that utilizes a database and works best when paired with Apache. Having a LAMP server set up will be the best starting point.

Objective

The following Spotify setup procedure outlines installation steps as provided by spotify.com. Nonetheless, may you encounter some difficulties along the way of the Spotify installation on Debian Stretch, read the appendix below to resolve them.

Requirements

Privileged access to your Debian Stretch system is required.

Difficulty

EASY

Conventions

Objective

Replace systemd with SysV Init as the init system on Debian Stretch

Distributions

Debian Stretch

Requirements

A working Debian Stretch install with root privileges.

Difficulty

Medium

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Not everyone loves systemd, and for those that don't, there really aren't many options. That's especially true if you want something like a stable server. Fear not, SysV Init is actually still supported under Debian, and it's not hard to switch.

**Note:** don't try this if you're running GNOME or another desktop environment that has a hard dependency on systemd. It will just break your system.

Add Devuan Repositories

This part isn't strictly necessary if you just want to switch the init system and leave systemd installed as a compatibility layer. That would work fine. If you absolutely don't want systemd on your system at all, you need to make some arrangements to make the things that depend on it work.

Devuan, the systemd-less Debian fork is lagging a bit behind. Their Stretch release, ASCII, isn't ready, and running Devuan's testing releases isn't super stable right now. However, the did build some crucial packages to make systemd-dependent programs work without it, and you can use them in Debian.

First, create a new .list file in /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ for Devuan. Then, add the following line to it.

Objective

Install packages from Ubuntu PPAs on Debian.

Distributions

Debian

Requirements

You need a working Debian install with root privileges.

Difficulty

Medium

Conventions

  • # - requires given linux commands to be executed with root privileges either directly as a root user or by use of sudo command
  • $ - requires given linux commands to be executed as a regular non-privileged user

Introduction

Ubuntu and it's derivatives are easily the most popular Linux distributions in the world. As a result, they enjoy more third party support than most other distributions, including Ubuntu's parent, Debian.

It's often frustrating for Debian users to come across software packaged in the .deb format and made freely available, but not to them. Ubuntu packages don't always work on Debian. Actually, more often than not, there's some kind of problem running or installing them. Plus, Debian isn't really set up to interact with Ubuntu PPAs.

So, what's a Debian user to do? That's something the Debian Project has thought of. There's actually a defined method for downloading source packages from Ubuntu PPAs and rebuilding them for Debian. As an added bonus, it's not really that hard.

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