Installing and using the ifconfig command on Debian

How to install missing ifconfig command on Linux

Most of us longtime Linux users have the ifconfig command seared into our brain, after years of repetitive use. It comes as a shock to some when they type the command and are met with an error message (ifconfig command not found). Indeed, the command has become deprecated, but it’s still possible to install ifconfig command.

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Linux commands cheat sheet

Linux commands cheat sheet

The command line terminal in Linux is the operating system’s most powerful component. However, due to the sheer amount of commands available, it can be intimidating for newcomers. Even longtime users may forget a command every once in a while and that is why we have created this Linux cheat sheet commands guide.
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ps sort by memory

Using ps sort by memory

The ps command in Linux can tell us all sorts of information about the running processes on our system. The command also reports memory usage for each running process. In this tutorial, you’ll see how to list processes on Linux, sorted by their memory consumption.

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mount command in Linux with examples

mount command in Linux with examples

We can use the mount command in Linux to attach file systems and removable devices such as USB flash drives. The default file system for most Linux distributions is ext4. We can also dismount file systems with the unmount command.

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dd command in Linux with examples

dd command in Linux with examples

Linux considers anything stored on a file system as files, even block devices. This means commands such as the dd command in Linux can be very handy in many situations, as it can be used to convert and copy files in the terminal, backup disks, or wipe data. The dd command is just as fundamental as it is useful, as it’s ready to use even on the most basic installations of Linux distros.

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du command in Linux with examples

du command in Linux with examples

On any operating system, the files on your hard disk take up a certain amount of space. In Linux specifically, you can view how much space that these files take up in the command line terminal by using the du command. The du command (the name is shortened from “disk usage”), as the name implies, will simply display, in its output, the amount of disk space being used by a specified file or directory.

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