How to backup gpg keys on paper

Having a reliable backup of our GPG (Gnu Privacy Guard) secret key is not optional: the key represents our identity, and loosing it could potentially be a disaster. Creating a backup of our keys and sub-keys is quite a simple thing to do using gpg, and the resulting files can be easily backed up on one or more devices. Electronic devices such USB drives or hard disks, however, tend to fail, and usually in the most inappropriate times; therefore as an extreme resort, we may want to print our keys to paper.

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How to manage git repositories with Python

Neither Python nor Git need presentations: the former is one of the most used general-purpose programming language; the latter is probably the most used version control system in the world, created by Linus Torvalds himself. Normally, we interact with git repositories using the git binary; when we need to work with them using Python, instead, we can use the GitPython library.

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Linux epoch time

Linux epoch time

Epoch time is a convention used on Unix and Linux systems that many applications rely on for calculating time between dates and other similar functions. Some Linux commands like date and perl have an epoch option built in. An epoch denotes the number of seconds that have passed since the date January 1st, 1970.

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Linux Cheat Sheet

Linux Cheat Sheet

In this tutorial, we will list various practical Linux commands to be used only as a reference guide and by experienced Linux users. Not all Linux commands will be available on your system by default so consider installing the relevant package before use.

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3 Methods to install PyCharm Community Edition on Linux

PyCharm is a professional Python IDE (Integrated Development Environment) developed by JetBrains, which supports a lot of features like code completion, refactoring, debugging, etc. Two versions of the IDE exist: the “Professional” version, which must be purchased, and the free, “Community” version, which is based on open source software, and can be downloaded and installed free of charge. Various methods can be used to install the IDE on Linux.

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Pax command examples on Linux

Pax command examples on Linux

pax is an archive utility somewhere between cpio and tar. This is just because it is independent of the specific archive format, and supports a wide variety of different archive formats. It can perform simple tasks as creating a compressed archive of a selected directory or it can as much easily create a daily incremental backup.

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Introduction to Tmux

Introduction to terminal multiplexer Tmux

Tmux is a terminal multiplexer: it let us run and manage multiple terminal sessions from a single screen. This is specially useful when connecting to remote machines using ssh, since, among the other things, it allows us to keep processes started from those terminals running in the background when we disconnect from the session (or logout and close the remote secure shell altogether), letting us re-attach to it at a later time.

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Installing and using the ifconfig command on Debian

How to install missing ifconfig command on Linux

Most of us longtime Linux users have the ifconfig command seared into our brain, after years of repetitive use. It comes as a shock to some when they type the command and are met with an error message (ifconfig command not found). Indeed, the command has become deprecated, but it’s still possible to install ifconfig command.

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Using the find and locate Linux commands to search for a file

Locate vs find: What is the difference

If you need to search for one or more particular files, Linux systems have a few powerful methods for locating them, such as the find and locate commands. Both of these commands have the same purpose, but they use a different methodology to find files. Searching for a file with a specific name can be done, but you can also search for files that follow certain naming patterns.

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How to install and use snaps on Fedora

Developed by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, and originally meant to be used on the latter, the Snappy package manager is a free and open source software used to install and manage snap packages. The purpose of Snap packages, just like flatpaks, is to distribute sandboxed and self-contained applications (applications are packaged together with their dependencies).

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