tee command in Linux with examples

tee command in Linux with examples

Any Linux user that has spent enough time with the command line will eventually run into a scenario where they would like to redirect standard output and/or standard error to a file (or multiple files) as well as the terminal at the same time. For something so trivial, surely there’s a way to send our output to both places at the same time. And this is exactly what the tee command in Linux is used for.

Read more

time command in Linux with examples

time command in Linux with examples

The time command in Linux is like a stop watch built directly into your command line terminal. The time command is able to track how much time any command takes to finish executing. All you need to do is preface some command with the time command. Your command will execute as normal, but it will also show the duration of the command.

Read more

How to use uname Linux command

uname command in Linux with examples

The uname command in Linux is one of the frequently used commands. On Linux systems, there are a multitude of commands that can be used to print system information. We cover many of these commands in our guide about getting to know the hardware of your Linux box. One such command would be uname, which is especially good for listing information about the operating system itself and the Linux kernel that is running.

Read more

How to use watch Linux command

Watch command in Linux with Examples

Have you ever had to sit at a Linux terminal and repeatedly type the same command while waiting for a different result? A common example from personal experience would be typing the ls command when waiting for a certain file to appear in a directory, such as when a running Bash script is expected to generate a file. For a situation like that is exactly why we have the watch command in Linux.

Read more

yes command in Linux with examples

yes command in Linux with examples

The yes command in Linux will automatically output a “y” or any string you specify, repeatedly. It’s one of the simplest commands on Linux, and one that most users will find they never have much use for. But then when you do need it, you’ll be thankful that your Linux system already includes this Linux command by default.

Read more

Recovering deleted files from a FAT filesystem on Linux

Data recovery of deleted files from the FAT filesystem

Although FAT32 or FAT16 are very old file systems, which is reflected in their poor performance in comparison to other file system alternatives, they are still widely used by many electronic devices. Usually, these devices include USB sticks, digital cameras, camcorders and other peripheral storage devices.

There’s a good chance that you own and store personal data on a device with the FAT filesystem. If you accidentally delete important data from the device, we’ve got good news for you: it can be recovered on Linux.

In this guide, we’ll go over the step by step instructions to recover deleted data from the FAT filesystem on Linux. Read on as we use the testdisk command to perform file recovery.

In this tutorial you will learn:

  • How to create a low level backup of FAT filesystem
  • How to install testdisk tool on major Linux distros
  • How to use testdisk to recover deleted files from FAT

Read more