Python editors on Raspberry Pi

Python editors on Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi can be an excellent choice for developers or hobbyist programmers as a small and lightweight workstation. Python is already installed by default on the Raspberry Pi, if you are running the default Raspberry Pi OS. Despite its small size, the Raspberry Pi contains hardware that is plenty sufficient to run a Python IDE so you can crank out your Python code. Unfortunately, some editors do not have ARM support, so our choices are slightly smaller on the Raspberry Pi.

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Raspberry Pi Unable to read partition as FAT

Raspberry Pi Unable to read partition as FAT

The Unable to read partition as FAT error will appear during the Raspberry Pi boot process if the device is not able to read the file system from the SD card. This is a generic error that can have a few different causes, such as a corrupt file system or faulty SD card. In this tutorial, we will attempt to troubleshoot the error by looking at some of the leading causes and attempt to rectify them. The end goal is to get your Raspberry Pi booting from the SD card as expected.

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Understanding Linux Permissions: The Differences between chmod and chown

Understanding Linux Permissions: The Differences between chmod and chown

If you are just starting to learn about file permissions on a Linux system, the chmod and chown commands will be your starting point for granting or revoking file permissions for user accounts. chmod and chown are completely different commands, yet they go hand in hand when it comes to modifying file permissions on the Linux file system. The basic summary is that chown can change the owner of a file, and chmod can change the permissions of the file, but this explanation is only scratching the surface.

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Recovering from Unintended Recursive chmod on System Directories: Steps and Precautions

Recovering from Unintended Recursive chmod on System Directories: Steps and Precautions

When tinkering around in the command line terminal of your Linux system, it is important to be aware that a small mishap can have dire consequences. Most Linux commands are not very forgiving, and there is often not an easy way to “reverse” a command after it has been run, especially on a large batch of files. The chmod command is one such command that users need to be wary of, as unintentionally changing the file permissions for system directories is not reversible, except through a slow, manual process.

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Ubuntu 22.04 boot repair how to guide

Ubuntu 22.04 boot repair how to guide

Although it should not happen often, your Ubuntu 22.04 may encounter a problem with booting if there is an error with the GRUB menu or a file in the system /boot directory. Fortunately for us, there is an easy way to fix a slew of common boot problems with a utility called Boot Repair. Whatever the case may be, Boot Repair is an excellent software to help us start troubleshooting.

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Understanding and Resolving File Ownership Issues on Linux: "Operation not permitted"

Understanding and Resolving File Ownership Issues on Linux: “Operation not permitted”

When attempting to change the ownership of a file on a Linux system, you may encounter the Operation not permitted error if the action fails. This generic error does not give us a lot of insight into what the problem could be, so we must do a little digging to figure out why the error is occurring. In this tutorial, we will go through some troubleshooting steps to determine why this error occurs while trying to change file ownership with the chown Linux command.

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Distinguishing Between the 'sudo' and 'admin' Groups in Linux: Roles and Usage

Distinguishing Between the ‘sudo’ and ‘admin’ Groups in Linux: Roles and Usage

In order to grant superuser privileges to ordinary users, Linux requires us to place the desired user accounts into a designated group for administrators. This group can have different names across various Linux distributions and system versions, such as sudo, admin, and wheel. Regardless of the name that your system uses, the group is granted superuser privileges by the settings within the /etc/sudoers configuration file. In this tutorial, we will explain the difference between the sudo, admin, and other similar user groups on a Linux system.

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Stat command: Usage and examples

Stat command: Usage and examples

The stat Linux command is one of the best ways to view the full details of any file that is stored on a Linux system. It is installed by default on all distributions, so there is nothing extra to install, and is basically a one stop shop for viewing file permissions, timestamp info like access times and modification times, and various other metadata for any file on your system. It also comes with a few handy options, allowing us to tailor the output for specific needs, and view information about all file types, including symbolic links, pseudo files, and others.

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"Welcome to emergency mode!" Boot Error: Understanding and Resolving fsck Issues

“Welcome to emergency mode!” Boot Error: Understanding and Resolving fsck Issues

A file system error is one possible reason that you may encounter the Welcome to emergency mode! error message when attempting to boot your Linux system. While in emergency mode, you can determine if a fsck (file system check) error is the culprit of your problems by examining the system logs with journalctl. Once you are sure that an fsck problem is to blame, there are a few troubleshooting steps you can take to remedy the problem.

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Explaining the Sticky Bit: What the "t" in Linux Directory Permissions Means

Explaining the Sticky Bit: What the “t” in Linux Directory Permissions Means

Most seasoned Linux users are already familiar with basic file permissions like read, write, and execute. These permissions exist on every file and administrators often need to edit such permissions in order to tighten up security or grant file access to certain users. A less common permission that you may not be as intimately familiar with is the “sticky bit.”

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